Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 37.1°N
  • 12.7°E

  • -8 m
    -26 ft

  • 211070
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Weekly Report: 27 November-3 December 2002


According to news articles, Enzo Boschi, the head of INGV, stated that seismicity increased near Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia a group of submarine volcanoes ~30 km S of Sicily, near Tunisia. Boschi stated, "The island could come back to the surface, but we'll have to wait and see... It could be a few weeks or months." The Stromboli On-Line website noted that similar statements have been made several times in the past couple of years. The increased seismicity does not necessarily signify that an eruption is imminent and the island will re-emerge above wave base.

Sources: Stromboli On-Line, Reuters

Index of Weekly Reports


2002: November

Weekly Reports


27 November-3 December 2002

According to news articles, Enzo Boschi, the head of INGV, stated that seismicity increased near Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia a group of submarine volcanoes ~30 km S of Sicily, near Tunisia. Boschi stated, "The island could come back to the surface, but we'll have to wait and see... It could be a few weeks or months." The Stromboli On-Line website noted that similar statements have been made several times in the past couple of years. The increased seismicity does not necessarily signify that an eruption is imminent and the island will re-emerge above wave base.

Sources: Stromboli On-Line; Reuters


The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia.

Campi Flegrei del Mar di Sicilia (Phlegraean Fields of the Sicily Sea) is composed of a group of submarine volcanoes SW of Sicily. The volcanoes were constructed within a submarine depression about 1000 m deep in the Strait of Sicily between the SW coast of Sicily and the NE tip of Tunisia, forming submarine banks that are capped by cones that rise to near sea level. Submarine eruptions were reported at the Giulia-Ferdinandeo and Pinne banks during the first Punic war (264-241 BCE), and from the 17th to 20th centuries, sometimes producing ephemeral islands. The 1831 eruption at Graham Island (also known as Graham Bank, Giulia-Ferdinandeo Bank, or Ferdinandea Bank) produced an ephemeral island that was promptly claimed by the navies of France, Britain, Spain, and Italy.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1911 Sep 30 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 1   Pinne
1867 Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations Pinne
1863 Aug 12 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Giulia Ferdinandeo
1846 Oct 4 1846 Oct 5 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Pinne
1831 Jun 28 (in or after) 1831 Aug 11 ± 4 days Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Giulia Ferdinandeo (Graham Island)
[ 1701 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2   Giulia Ferdinandeo
1632 Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations Giulia Ferdinandeo
0253 BCE ± 12 years Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Synonyms

Phlegraean Fields of the Sicily Sea | Campi Fleigrei Canale de Sicilia

Craters

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Anfitrite Submarine crater
Cimotoe Submarine crater
Galatea Submarine crater
Giulia-Ferdinandeo
    Corrao
    Graham Island
    Graham Bank
    Ferdinandea Bank
    Hotham
    Nerita
    Scircca
Submarine crater 37° 12' 0" N 12° 42' 0" E
Madrepore Submarine crater 36° 42' 0" N 13° 42' 0" E
Nerita Bank Submarine crater 37° 6' 0" N 13° 6' 0" E
Pantelleria Bank Submarine crater 37° 12' 0" N 12° 6' 0" E
Pinne
    Pinne Marine
Submarine crater 36° 54' 0" N 13° 0' 0" E
Smyt Bank I Submarine crater 37° 36' 0" N 12° 6' 0" E
Smyt Bank II Submarine crater 37° 18' 0" N 11° 54' 0" E
Talbot Bank Submarine crater 37° 30' 0" N 11° 42' 0" E
Terribile Bank Submarine crater 37° 12' 0" N 12° 42' 0" E
Tetide Submarine crater
An eruption column rises above Graham Island (Giulia Ferdinandeo) in the Sicilian Sea in 1831. A new island was formed that was promptly claimed by Italy, France, Britain, and Spain. All territorial claims came to naught when the island quickly eroded to beneath the sea surface after the eruption ended. Graham Island (also known as Ferdinandeo Bank) is part of the Campi Flegrei del Mar di Sicilia (Phlegraean Fields of the Sicily Sea), a group of submarine volcanoes constructed within a depression about 1000 m deep SW of Sicily.

From the collection of Maurice and Katia Krafft (published in Simkin and Siebert, 1994).
This dramatic painting of a nighttime view of the eruption of Graham Island (Giulia Ferdinandeo) on July 13, 1831 shows late-stage strombolian eruptions originating from several vents along a fissure. A submarine eruption that began sometime after June 28, when earthquakes were first reported, eventually constructed a new island that reached a height of 65 m and a diameter of about 1/2 km. After August, when the eruption ended, the ephemeral island soon eroded beneath the sea.

From the collection of Maurice and Katia Krafft (published in Simkin and Siebert, 1994).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Francis P W, 1995. Fire and water. Geol Today, 11: 27-31.

Imbo G, 1965. Italy. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 18: 1-72.

Peccerillo A, 2005. Plio-Quaternary Volcanism in Italy. Berlin: Springer, 365 p.

Washington H S, 1909. The submarine eruptions of 1831 and 1891 near Pantelleria. Amer J Sci, 27: 130-150.

Volcano Types

Submarine(es)

Tectonic Setting

Rift zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Trachybasalt / Tephrite Basanite
Basalt / Picro-Basalt

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
230,578
230,578
230,578
633,350

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.