Auckland Field

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
  Google Earth Placemark
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 36.9°S
  • 174.87°E

  • 260 m
    853 ft

  • 241020
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Auckland Field.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Auckland Field.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Auckland Field.

The 140 sq km Auckland volcanic field, which is a late Pleistocene to late Holocene in age, lies at the southern end of the Northland Peninsula and is overlain by New Zealand's largest city. More than 50 maars, tuff rings, small lava shields, and scoria cones have formed in the past 140,000 years in an elliptical volcanic field 29 km long in its largest (N-S) direction. The Auckland volcanic field has dominantly produced intraplate alkali basaltic to basantic rocks forming the northernmost of a group of Quaternary volcanic fields of the Auckland Intraplate Province. Of the 19 eruptions known to have occurred within the past 20,000 years, only one eruptive center is known to have been active during the Holocene (Smith and Allen, 1993). The Rangitoto eruption, about 600 years ago, was the largest of the Auckland volcanic field and created the 6-km-wide Rangitoto Island, which consists of multiple scoria cones up to 260-m high that cap a low shield volcano with a broad apron of lava flows.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1350 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Rangitoto

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Cones

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Albert Park Cone 36° 51' 0" S 174° 46' 0" E
Albert, Mount Cone 152 m 36° 54' 0" S 174° 43' 0" E
Ash Hill Tuff cone 37° 1' 0" S 174° 52' 0" E
Cambria, Mount Cone 36° 50' 0" S 174° 49' 0" E
Crater Hill Tuff cone 37 m 36° 59' 0" S 174° 50' 0" E
Domain Tuff ring 36° 52' 0" S 174° 46' 0" E
Duders Hill Cone 36° 50' 0" S 174° 48' 0" E
Eden, Mount Cone 196 m 36° 53' 0" S 174° 46' 0" E
Epsom Avenue Cone 36° 53' 0" S 174° 46' 0" E
Gabriel, Mount Cone 61 m 36° 59' 0" S 174° 46' 0" E
Green Hill Cone 36° 57' 0" S 174° 54' 0" E
Hobson, Mount Cone 143 m 36° 53' 0" S 174° 47' 0" E
Hopua Tuff ring 36° 56' 0" S 174° 47' 0" E
Jellicoe Park Cone 36° 56' 0" S 174° 47' 0" E
Kohuora Tuff cone 30 m 36° 59' 0" S 174° 51' 0" E
Little Rangitoto Cone 36° 53' 0" S 174° 50' 0" E
Mangere Lagoon Tuff ring 36° 58' 0" S 174° 47' 0" E
Mangere Mountain Cone 107 m 36° 57' 0" S 174° 47' 0" E
Manurewa
    Wiri Mountain
Cone 90 m 37° 1' 0" S 174° 52' 0" E
Matakarua
    Mcloughlin's Hill
Cone 73 m 37° 1' 0" S 174° 51' 0" E
Maungataketake
    Ihumatao
Cone 50 m 37° 0' 0" S 174° 45' 0" E
Mclennan's Hill Cone 55 m 36° 56' 0" S 174° 51' 0" E
Motukorea
    Brown's Island
Cone 68 m 36° 50' 0" S 174° 54' 0" E
North Head Cone 61 m 36° 50' 0" S 174° 49' 0" E
One Tree Hill Cone 183 m 36° 54' 0" S 174° 47' 0" E
Onepoto Tuff ring 36° 49' 0" S 174° 45' 0" E
Orakei Basin Tuff ring 36° 52' 0" S 174° 49' 0" E
Otara Hill
    Smales Hill
Cone 89 m 36° 57' 0" S 175° 54' 0" E
Otuataua Cone 36° 59' 0" S 174° 45' 0" E
Outhwaite Park Cone 36° 53' 0" S 174° 47' 0" E
Panmure Basin Tuff ring 15 m 36° 55' 0" S 174° 51' 0" E
Pigeon Mountain Cone 55 m 36° 53' 0" S 174° 54' 0" E
Pukaki Tuff ring 36° 59' 0" S 174° 49' 0" E
Pukeiti Cone 36° 59' 0" S 174° 46' 0" E
Pukekiwiriki Tuff ring 36° 57' 0" S 174° 52' 0" E
Puketutu Island Cone 65 m 36° 58' 0" S 174° 45' 0" E
Pupuke, Lake Tuff ring 30 m 36° 47' 0" S 174° 46' 0" E
Purchas Hill Cone 36° 54' 0" S 174° 51' 0" E
Rangitoto Cone 260 m 36° 47' 0" S 174° 51' 29" E
Richmond, Mount Cone 50 m 36° 56' 0" S 174° 51' 0" E
Robertson, Mount Cone 36° 57' 0" S 174° 51' 0" E
Roskill, Mount Cone 110 m 36° 55' 0" S 174° 44' 0" E
Shoal Bay Tuff cone 30 m 36° 49' 0" S 174° 45' 0" E
Smart, Mount Cone 92 m 36° 55' 0" S 174° 49' 0" E
St. Heliers
    Saint Heliers
Tuff ring 36° 51' 0" S 174° 52' 0" E
St. John, Mount
    Saint John, Mount
Cone 36° 53' 0" S 174° 47' 0" E
Styaks Swamp Cone 36° 56' 0" S 174° 54' 0" E
Symonds Street Cone 36° 53' 0" S 174° 46' 0" E
Tank Farm Tuff ring 36° 48' 0" S 174° 45' 0" E
Taylors Hill Cone 56 m 36° 52' 0" S 174° 52' 0" E
Three Kings Tuff ring 133 m 36° 54' 0" S 174° 45' 0" E
Victoria, Mount Cone 66 m 36° 50' 0" S 174° 48' 0" E
Wellington, Mount Cone 137 m 36° 54' 0" S 174° 51' 0" E

Craters

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Cemetary Crater Maar 37° 0' 0" S 174° 51' 0" E
St. Marys Crater
    Saint Marys Crater
Maar 37° 0' 0" S 174° 51' 0" E
Waitomokia Maar 36° 59' 0" S 174° 46' 0" E
Auckland, New Zealand's largest city, is constructed over the 140 sq km Auckland volcanic field. The volcanic field contains more than 50 maars, tuff rings, and scoria cones that were formed during eruptions over the past 150,000 years. Of the 19 eruptions known to have occurred during the past 20,000 years, only one, Rangitoto, took place during the Holocene. It formed a low shield volcano capped by a scoria cone about 600 years ago.

Photo by Jim Cole (University of Canterbury).
Rangitoto shield volcano, the youngest volcanic center of New Zealand's Auckland volcanic field, forms a 5.5-km-wide island. The volcano, seen here from the NW, erupted about 600 years ago and is capped by a scoria cone containing a deep crater. The 140 sq km Auckland volcanic field contains more than 50 maars, tuff rings, and scoria cones. Of the 19 eruptions known to have occurred during the past 20,000 years, only Rangitoto has erupted during the Holocene.

Photo by Jim Cole (University of Canterbury).
Brown's Island (also known as Motukorea), in Waitemata Harbour, New Zealand, is composed of the remnant of a tuff ring (right side), scoria cones (center), and lava flows that form the flat peninsula in the foreground. It is one of 50 Pleistocene-to-Holocene centers in the Auckland volcanic field. The low-angle slopes of lava flows from Rangitoto, the only Holocene center, are visible to the north in the background.

Photo by B. Thompson (published in Green and Short, 1971).
The 140 sq km Auckland volcanic field is overlain by New Zealand's largest city. This view looking SW from the summit of Rangitoto volcano shows volcanic cones on a peninsula extending into Waitemata Harbor with downtown Auckland behind it. North Head (left) and Mount Victoria (right) on the peninsula are two of the more than 50 maars, tuff rings, and scoria cones that have formed in the past 150,000 years in the Auckland volcanic field. Rangitoto is the only known Holocene center.

Photo by Ichio Moriya (Kanazawa University).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Cassidy J, France S J, Locke C A, 2007. Gravity and magnetic investigation of maar volcanoes, Auckland volcanic field, New Zealand. J Volc Geotherm Res, 159: 153-163.

Heming R F, Barnet P R, 1986. The petrology and petrochemistry of the Auckland volcanic field. Roy Soc New Zeal Bull, 23: 64-75.

Houghton B F, Wilson C J N, Rosenberg M D, Smith I E M, Parker R J, 1996. Mixed deposits of complex magmatic and phreatomagmatic volcanism: an example from Crater Hill, Auckland, New Zealand. Bull Volc, 58: 59-66.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Johnson R W, Knutson J, Taylor S R (eds), 1989. Intraplate Volcanism in Eastern Australia and New Zealand. Cambridge, England: Cambridge Univ Press, 408 p.

Nairn I A, Cole J W, 1975. New Zealand. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 22: 1-156.

Rout D J, Cassidy J, Locke C A, Smith I E M, 1993. Geophysical evidence for temporal and structural relationships within the monogenetic basalt volcanoes of the Auckland volcanic field, northern New Zealand. J Volc Geotherm Res, 57: 71-83.

Shane P, Hoverd J, 2002. Distal record of multi-sourced tephra in Onepoto Basin, Auckland, New Zealand: implications for volcanic chronology, frequency and hazards. Bull Volc, 64: 441-454.

Smith I E M, Allen S R, 1993. Volcanic hazards at the Auckland Volcanic Field. New Zeal Ministry Civil Defense, Volc Hazards Inf Ser, 5: 1-34.

Sporli K B, Eastwood V R, 1997. Elliptical boundary of an intraplate volcanic field, Auckland, New Zealand. J Volc Geotherm Res, 79: 169-179.

Volcano Types

Volcanic field

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Trachybasalt / Tephrite Basanite
Basalt / Picro-Basalt
Foidite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
1,049,110
1,049,110
1,222,436
1,446,768

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Auckland Field Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.