Sundoro

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 7.3°S
  • 109.992°E

  • 3136 m
    10286 ft

  • 263210
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

28 March-3 April 2012

CVGHM reported that seismicity at Sundoro continued to increase into January after the Alert Level was raised from 1 to 2 (on a scale of 1-4) on 5 December 2011. After the first week of January through 27 March the number of daily earthquakes significantly decreased. The Alert Level was lowered to 1 on 30 March.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)

Index of Weekly Reports


2012: March
2011: December

Weekly Reports


28 March-3 April 2012

CVGHM reported that seismicity at Sundoro continued to increase into January after the Alert Level was raised from 1 to 2 (on a scale of 1-4) on 5 December 2011. After the first week of January through 27 March the number of daily earthquakes significantly decreased. The Alert Level was lowered to 1 on 30 March.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


7 December-13 December 2011

CVGHM reported increased seismic activity at Sundoro during October -4 December. On 26 November and 2 December smoke was reported from many fumaroles around the summit crater. Based on visual and seismic data, CVGHM raised the Alert Level from 1 to 2 (on a scale of 1-4) on 5 December.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


Index of Monthly Reports

Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

08/2013 (BGVN 38:08) Fumarolic and seismic activity in late 2011 results in brief rise in alert level


Contents of Monthly Reports

All information contained in these reports is preliminary and subject to change.

All times are local (= UTC + 7 hours)

08/2013 (BGVN 38:08) Fumarolic and seismic activity in late 2011 results in brief rise in alert level

An HTML version of this report is not available, please read this report as a PDF file.

Gunung Sundoro, one Java's most symmetrical volcanoes, is separated by a 1400-m-high saddle from Sumbing volcano. Parasitic craters and cones, the largest of which is Kembang, occur on the NW-to-southern flanks, and all fed lava flows. A small lava dome occupies the summit crater of the 3136-m-high volcano, and numerous phreatic explosion vents were formed along radial fissure that cut the dome and extend across the crater rim. Lava flows extend in all directions from the summit crater. Deposits of a large prehistoric debris avalanche are located below the NE flank of Sundoro. Pyroclastic-flow deposits dated at 1720 years before present extend as far as 13 km from the summit. Historical eruptions typically have consisted of mild-to-moderate phreatic explosions, mostly from the summit crater. Flank vents were also active in 1882 and 1903.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1971 Oct 29 1971 Nov 9 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1906 Sep 22 1906 Dec 20 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit crater K5
1903 Oct 17 1903 Oct 21 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Upper NE and SW flanks (2850-2980 m)
1902 May 1 1902 May 25 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1887 Nov 13 1887 Nov 14 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1883 Aug (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1882 Apr 1 1882 Apr 7 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit, NW and NE flanks
1818 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1806 (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
0470 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
0230 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.



Synonyms
Soendoro | Sindoro | Sendoro


Cones
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Arum, Gunung Cone - Crater 2129 m
Buntuk Gede, Gunung Vent 1220 m
Kekep, Gunung Cone - Crater 1746 m
Kembang, Gunung Cone - Crater 2339 m
Pagerluhir, Gunung Vent 1317 m
Watu, Gunung Cone - Crater 1657 m


Craters
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Segoro Banjaran
    Segoro Bandjaran
Crater
Segoro Wedi Crater
The beautifully symmetrical Sundoro volcano, seen here from Wadas Putih village to its NW, is one of two conical 3000-m-high stratovolcanoes SE of the Dieng volcanic complex. Explosive eruptions have occurred from both summit and flank vents at Gunung Sundoro during historical time, most recently in 1971.

Photo by Ruska Hadian, 1979 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
The floor of the K1 crater at the summit of Sundoro volcano contains a shallow lake. The 150-m-wide, 75-m-deep crater is the largest of the many craters cutting the summit of Sundoro. It is seen here from the rim of the next largest crater, K2, immediately to the south.

Photo by Sumarma Hamidi, 1973 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
Farmers cultivate land on the eastern flank of picturesque Gunung Sundoro, one of the most symmetrical volcanoes in Java. The 3136-m-high stratovolcano towers 2500 m above its base, immediately NW of its neighboring conical volcano, Gunung Sumbing. A small lava dome occupies the summit crater, which has fed lava flows in all directions. Historical eruptions typically have consisted of mild-to-moderate phreatic explosions, mostly from the summit crater, although flank vents were also active in 1882 and 1903.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1995 (Smithsonian Institution).
Gunung Sundoro is a prominent, symmetrical stratovolcano that rises to 3151 m immediately NE of Sumbing volcano. The foreground hill is part of the deposits of a large prehistoric debris avalanche that traveled up to 20 km prior to formation of the present-day volcano. Explosive eruptions have occurred from both summit and flank vents in historical time.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1995 (Smithsonian Institution).
The SE flank of symmetrical Gunung Sundoro rises above fields immediately west of the broad saddle with Sumbing volcano. Sundoro has erupted in historical time from both summit and flank vents. The satellitic cone at the lower left is Gunung Kembang.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1995 (Smithsonian Institution).
An aerial view from the SE looks across the summit crater complex of Sundoro volcano to the Dieng volcanic complex. Several historically active craters and fissure vents cut the summit of symmetrical Gunung Sundoro. The forested peak at the top center is Gunung Prahu, the largest stratovolcano of the Dieng complex; to its left in the clouds is the Dieng Plateau, the location of many maars and phreatic explosion craters.

Photo published in Taverne, 1926 "Vulkaanstudien op Java," (courtesy of Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
An aerial view from the NW looks across the summit crater complex of Gunung Sundoro volcano to Gunung Sumbing. These imposing 3000-m-high conical stratovolcanoes form prominent landmarks between the Dieng volcanic complex and the city of Yogjakarta. Both volcanoes have erupted in historical time.

Photo published in Taverne, 1926 "Vulkaanstudien op Java," (courtesy of Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
The two small peaks at the left are part of the Telomoyo volcanic complex, which was constructed along a NNW-SSE-trending line of volcanoes extending from Ungaran in the north to Merapi in the south. Telomoyo filled much of the southern side of a depression formed by collapse of the Pleistocene Soropati volcano and grew to a height of 600 m above its rim. The two towering conical peaks in the background are Sumbing (L) and Sundoro (R); Slamet volcano is on the far right horizon.

Photo by Hideko and Minoru Kusakabe, 2000 (Okayama University).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Kusumadinata K, 1979. Data Dasar Gunungapi Indonesia. Bandung: Volc Surv Indonesia, 820 p.

Neumann van Padang M, 1951. Indonesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 1: 1-271.

Sukhyar R, 1989. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of arc rocks from Dieng, Sundoro and Sumbing volcanic complexes, central Java, Indonesia. Unpublished PhD thesis, Monash University, 319 p.

Sukhyar R, Sumartadipura N S, Erfan R D, 1992. Geologic map of Sundoro volcano, central Java. Volc Surv Indonesia, 1:50,000 geol map.

Taverne N J M, 1926. Vulkanstudien op Java. Vulk Meded, 7: 1-132.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano
Pyroclastic cone(s)
Lava dome

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite
Basalt / Picro-Basalt

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
52,462
496,751
2,086,299
24,996,512

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Sundoro Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.