Sumbing

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 7.384°S
  • 110.07°E

  • 3371 m
    11057 ft

  • 263220
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Weekly Report: 30 July-5 August 2008 Cite this Report


Based on pilot observations, the Darwin VAAC reported that an eruption plume from Sumbing rose to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery. [Correction: CVGHM later confirmed that Sumbing did not erupt on 1 August and attributed the plume origin to either a different volcano or a bushfire that was reported in the area.]

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


Most Recent Bulletin Report: November 2008 (BGVN 33:11) Cite this Report


False report of an eruption plume in August 2008

The announcement of an eruption in the Smithsonian/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report (30 July-5 August 2008) was later found to be false. The Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) noted that a pilot reported an eruption plume from Sumbing on 1 August 2008. The plume allegedly rose to an altitude of 4.9 km and drifted W. However, ash was not identified on satellite imagery. Center of Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM) observers at the local observatory saw only non-eruptive processes at the volcano, and they noted brush fires in September and October. A common problem in this active region occurs when drifting plumes become linked to the wrong volcano. After discussing the field observations, both Darwin VAAC and Indonesia's CVGHM concluded the report was in error. No thermal anomalies have been detected by the MODIS/MODVOLC satellite system for the volcano since 5 October 2006.

The area of Mt. Sumbing, close to Mt. Sundoro (also known as Sindoro) on Java (figure 1), was the subject of a recent study of people's perceptions and reactions to volcanic hazards (Lavignea and others, 2008). Note that there is another stratovolcano named Sumbing on Sumatra. In addition, one of the domes of Kelut (Java) is known as Sumbing.

Figure 1. Area around the twin active volcanoes of Sumbing and Sundoro. Note the nearby volcanological observatory at Gentingsari. The circles around the volcano summits represent radii of ~ 4 and 6 km from the summit. From Lavignea and others (2008).

Reference. Lavignea, F., De Costerb, B., Juvinb, N., Flohicb, F., Gaillardc, J-C., Texierd, P., Morine, J., and Sartohadif, J., 2008, People's behaviour in the face of volcanic hazards: Perspectives from Javanese communities, Indonesia: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, v. 172 (3-4), p. 273-287.

Information Contacts: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC), Bureau of Meteorology, Northern Territory Regional Office, PO Box 40050, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia (URL: http://www.bom.gov.au/info/vaac/); Center of Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM), Saut Simatupang, 57, Bandung 40122, Indonesia (URL: http://portal.vsi.esdm.go.id/joomla/).

Weekly Reports - Index


2008: July


30 July-5 August 2008 Cite this Report


Based on pilot observations, the Darwin VAAC reported that an eruption plume from Sumbing rose to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery. [Correction: CVGHM later confirmed that Sumbing did not erupt on 1 August and attributed the plume origin to either a different volcano or a bushfire that was reported in the area.]

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


Bulletin Reports - Index


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

11/2008 (BGVN 33:11) False report of an eruption plume in August 2008




Information is preliminary and subject to change. All times are local (unless otherwise noted)


November 2008 (BGVN 33:11) Cite this Report


False report of an eruption plume in August 2008

The announcement of an eruption in the Smithsonian/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report (30 July-5 August 2008) was later found to be false. The Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) noted that a pilot reported an eruption plume from Sumbing on 1 August 2008. The plume allegedly rose to an altitude of 4.9 km and drifted W. However, ash was not identified on satellite imagery. Center of Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM) observers at the local observatory saw only non-eruptive processes at the volcano, and they noted brush fires in September and October. A common problem in this active region occurs when drifting plumes become linked to the wrong volcano. After discussing the field observations, both Darwin VAAC and Indonesia's CVGHM concluded the report was in error. No thermal anomalies have been detected by the MODIS/MODVOLC satellite system for the volcano since 5 October 2006.

The area of Mt. Sumbing, close to Mt. Sundoro (also known as Sindoro) on Java (figure 1), was the subject of a recent study of people's perceptions and reactions to volcanic hazards (Lavignea and others, 2008). Note that there is another stratovolcano named Sumbing on Sumatra. In addition, one of the domes of Kelut (Java) is known as Sumbing.

Figure 1. Area around the twin active volcanoes of Sumbing and Sundoro. Note the nearby volcanological observatory at Gentingsari. The circles around the volcano summits represent radii of ~ 4 and 6 km from the summit. From Lavignea and others (2008).

Reference. Lavignea, F., De Costerb, B., Juvinb, N., Flohicb, F., Gaillardc, J-C., Texierd, P., Morine, J., and Sartohadif, J., 2008, People's behaviour in the face of volcanic hazards: Perspectives from Javanese communities, Indonesia: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, v. 172 (3-4), p. 273-287.

Information Contacts: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC), Bureau of Meteorology, Northern Territory Regional Office, PO Box 40050, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia (URL: http://www.bom.gov.au/info/vaac/); Center of Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM), Saut Simatupang, 57, Bandung 40122, Indonesia (URL: http://portal.vsi.esdm.go.id/joomla/).

Basic Data

Volcano Number

Last Known Eruption

Elevation

Latitude
Longitude
263220

1730 CE

3371 m / 11057 ft

7.384°S
110.07°E

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano
Pyroclastic cone(s)

Rock Types

Major
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite
Basalt / Picro-Basalt
Dacite

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
15,294
310,361
2,425,607
25,707,858

Geological Summary

Gunung Sumbing is a prominent 3371-m-high stratovolcano that lies across a 1400-m-high saddle from symmetrical Sundoro volcano in central Java. Prominent flank cones are located on the north and SE sides of Sumbing, which is somewhat more dissected than Sundoro volcano. An 800-m-wide horseshoe-shaped summit crater breached to the NE is partially filled by a lava dome that fed a lava flow down to 2400 m altitude. Emplacement of the dome followed the eruption of extensive pyroclastic flows down the NE flank. The only report of historical activity, in about 1730 CE, may have produced the small phreatic craters found at the summit.

References

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography.

Neumann van Padang M, 1951. Indonesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 1: 1-271.

Sukhyar R, 1989. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of arc rocks from Dieng, Sundoro and Sumbing volcanic complexes, central Java, Indonesia. Unpublished PhD thesis, Monash University, 319 p.

Taverne N J M, 1926. Vulkanstudien op Java. Vulk Meded, 7: 1-132.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1730 (?) Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Synonyms

Soembing

Cones

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Beser Stratovolcano
Gianti Stratovolcano

Photo Gallery


The prominent stratovolcano Sumbing rises above rice fields to 3371 m immediately to the SE of Sundoro volcano. An 800-m-wide crater at the summit is breached to the NE, and flank cones are located on the north and SW sides. The only report of historical activity from Sumbing volcano was a phreatic explosion from the summit crater in 1730.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1995 (Smithsonian Institution).
Gunung Sumbing is seen here from the NNW, east of the saddle separating it from Sundoro volcano. Both conical stratovolcanoes rise above 3000 m. Sumbing volcano has been less active during historical time than Sundoro. During one of the more recent eruptions of Sumbing volcano, a lava dome was emplaced in the summit crater and a lava flow traveled down the NE flank.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1995 (Smithsonian Institution).
An aerial view from the NW looks across the summit crater complex of Gunung Sundoro volcano to Gunung Sumbing. These imposing 3000-m-high conical stratovolcanoes form prominent landmarks between the Dieng volcanic complex and the city of Yogjakarta. Both volcanoes have erupted in historical time.

Photo published in Taverne, 1926 "Vulkaanstudien op Java," (courtesy of Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
A blocky lava dome fills the summit crater of Gunung Sumbing volcano. This view from the south shows the breached NE crater rim, through which a lava flow descended. The upper light-colored area on the left is a small pond, and the lower is a fumarolic area.

Photo published in Taverne, 1926 "Vulkaanstudien op Java," (courtesy of Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
The two small peaks at the left are part of the Telomoyo volcanic complex, which was constructed along a NNW-SSE-trending line of volcanoes extending from Ungaran in the north to Merapi in the south. Telomoyo filled much of the southern side of a depression formed by collapse of the Pleistocene Soropati volcano and grew to a height of 600 m above its rim. The two towering conical peaks in the background are Sumbing (L) and Sundoro (R); Slamet volcano is on the far right horizon.

Photo by Hideko and Minoru Kusakabe, 2000 (Okayama University).

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


A listing of samples from the Smithsonian collections will be available soon.

Affiliated Sites

Large Eruptions of Sumbing Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
MODVOLC - HIGP MODIS Thermal Alert System Using infrared satellite Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, scientists at the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawai'i, developed an automated system called MODVOLC to map thermal hot-spots in near real time. For each MODIS image, the algorithm automatically scans each 1 km pixel within it to check for high-temperature hot-spots. When one is found the date, time, location, and intensity are recorded. MODIS looks at every square km of the Earth every 48 hours, once during the day and once during the night, and the presence of two MODIS sensors in space allows at least four hot-spot observations every two days. Each day updated global maps are compiled to display the locations of all hot spots detected in the previous 24 hours. There is a drop-down list with volcano names which allow users to 'zoom-in' and examine the distribution of hot-spots at a variety of spatial scales.
MIROVA Middle InfraRed Observation of Volcanic Activity (MIROVA) is a near real time volcanic hot-spot detection system based on the analysis of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data. In particular, MIROVA uses the Middle InfraRed Radiation (MIR), measured over target volcanoes, in order to detect, locate and measure the heat radiation sourced from volcanic activity.