San Pablo Volcanic Field

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.12°N
  • 121.3°E

  • 1090 m
    3575 ft

  • 273060
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for San Pablo Volcanic Field.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for San Pablo Volcanic Field.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for San Pablo Volcanic Field.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1350 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Anthropology Sampaloc Lake

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Alligator Lake, along the southern shore of Laguna de Bay, is one of a group of dozens of maars and scoria cones forming the San Pablo volcanic field (also known as the Laguna volcanic field). Three generations of maars are present, the youngest of which contain deep lakes. Many of the maars are located along a NE-SW trend. Local legends indicate that the most recent eruption occurred about 500-700 years ago at Sampaloc Lake, 17 km SE of Alligator Lake.

Photo by Chris Newhall, 1989 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
Local legends suggest that the latest eruption of the Laguna volcanic field took place about 500-700 years ago, forming the Sampaloc Lake maar. This 1.2-km-wide maar, seen here from the south, is one of the largest of a group of 36 maars in the volcanic field, which is located south of Laguna de Bay, a large lake SE of Manila.

Photo by Chris Newhall, 1989 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
Forested Maquiling (Makiling) stratovolcano (center) rises south of Laguna de Bay (top) and is the highest point of the San Pablo volcanic field. The andesitic-rhyolitic volcano has a deep crater whose floor is 480 m below its north rim. Maquiling has several parasitic cones, maars, and numerous thermal areas at its northern base, and other maars and scoria cones of the San Pablo volcanic field lie to the east. The prominent dark-colored maar along the shore of Laguna de Bay north of Maquiling is Alligator Lake.

NASA Landsat image, 2002 (courtesy of Hawaii Synergy Project, Univ. of Hawaii Institute of Geophysics & Planetology).
See title for photo information.
Lake-filled maars are common features of the Laguna volcanic field at the southern end of the large lake of Laguna de Bay (top). The monogenetic volcanic field contains a group of 42 scoria cones and 36 maars, the youngest of which contain deep lakes. The largest maar in this Landsat image is 1.2-km-wide Sampaloc Lake, immediately north of the city of San Pablo. Local legends suggest that this maar was formed about 500-700 years ago. The forested stratovolcano at left is Maquiling volcano.

NASA Landsat image, 2002 (courtesy of Hawaii Synergy Project, Univ. of Hawaii Institute of Geophysics & Planetology).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for San Pablo Volcanic Field in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites