Kambalny

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 51.306°N
  • 156.875°E

  • 2116 m
    6940 ft

  • 300010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Kambalny.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Kambalny.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Kambalny.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1350 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


The compound 2156-m-high Kambalny (left center) and 1812-m-high Koshelev (far right) stratovolcanoes rise SW above the azure waters of Kurile Lake caldera, one of the scenic highlights of the Kamchatka Peninsula. Kambalny is the southernmost large stratovolcano on Kamchatka and Koshelev is its southernmost historically active volcano. Both volcanoes have produced late-stage, very recent lava flows from flank vents on complex older structures. The small island in Kurile Lake caldera is the "Heart of Alaid," a rhyolitic lava dome.

Photo by Nikolai Smelov, 1980 (courtesy of Vera Ponomareva, Inst. Volcanic Geology & Geochemistry, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
The compound stratovolcanoes of Kambalny (left) and Koshelev (right), rise beyond the SW shore of scenic Kurile Lake caldera at the southern tip of Kamchatka. Kurile Lake caldera formed in two stages, the first about 41,500 radiocarbon years ago and the second about 8000 years ago during one of Kamchatka's largest Holocene eruptions. The small island (right center) is the "Heart of Alaid," a rhyolitic lava dome. The conical peak on the distant horizon at right center is Alaid stratovolcano, the northernmost of the Kuril Islands.

Photo by Nikolai Smelov, 1996 (courtesy of Vera Ponomareva, Inst. Volcanic Geology & Geochemistry, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
A cumulus cloud rises above the summit of Kambalny, the southernmost large stratovolcano on the Kamchatka peninsula. The 2156-m-high compound volcano rises above the SW shores of scenic Kurile Lake caldera. There are no records of historical eruptions from Kambalny although very youthful cinder cones and lava flows on the west and SE flanks suggest the possibility of very recent eruptions. Active fumarolic areas are found on the flanks of the volcano.

Photo by Nikolai Smelov, 1996 (courtesy of Vera Ponomareva, Inst. Volcanic Geology & Geochemistry, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Kambalny in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites