Segula

Photo of this volcano
  • United States
  • Alaska
  • Stratovolcano
  • Unknown - Evidence Credible
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 52.015°N
  • 178.136°E

  • 1160 m
    3805 ft

  • 311030
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Segula.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Segula.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Segula.

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Eruptive History


The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Segula. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Segula page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

Deformation History


There is no Deformation History data available for Segula.

Emission History


There is no Emissions History data available for Segula.

Photo Gallery


A prominent N-S-trending fissure that extends to sea level at both ends cuts across Segula volcano, located near the western end of the Aleutian arc. The irregular topography on the north side of the island is formed by an extensive lava field that was erupted from the summit crater and blankets the NE flank of the volcano to the coast. A smaller lava field at the lower right originated from a cinder cone on the lower SE flank. A cinder cone constructed along the south rim of a small caldera forms the 1153 m high point of the island.

Photo by U.S. Air Force (published in U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1028-K).
See title for photo information.
The view WNW from the western side of Little Sitkin Island includes the broad snow-free island of Davidof, part of the rim of a largely submerged caldera, across the right center. The snow-capped peak behind Davidof is historically active Segula volcano. In the background at far left is the snow-capped Kiska volcano.

Photo by Steve Ebbert, 2000 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).
See title for photo information.
The 6 x 7 km island of Segula is seen offshore from the SW. The conical stratovolcano cut by a prominent NNW-SSE-trending fissure that extends to sea level at both ends of the island. The summit of Segula contains a small, poorly defined caldera that is partly overtopped on the south by a cinder cone that forms the 1153 m high point of the island. No historical eruptions are known from Segula, but fresh-looking lava flows are found on the north flank.

Photo by Christina Neal, 2005 (Alaska Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


The following 44 samples associated with this volcano can be found in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections, and may be availble for research (contact the Rock and Ore Collections Manager). Catalog number links will open a window with more information.

Catalog Number Sample Description Lava Source Collection Date
NMNH 118207-1 Breccia -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-10 Volcanic Ash -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-11 Basaltic andesite scoria -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-12 Andesite debris flow -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-13 Basaltic andesite lapilli tephra -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-14 Debris flow -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-15 Debris flow -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-16 Debris flow -- 9 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-17 Soil -- 9 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-18 Debris flow -- 9 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-19 Soil -- 9 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-2 Breccia -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-20 Debris flow -- 9 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-21 Scoria -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-22 Basalt -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-23 Scoria -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-24 Andesite debris flow -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-25 Debris flow -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-26 Basalt -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-27 Basalt -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-28 Basalt -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-29 Basalt -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-3 Andesite -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-30 Basaltic Andesite -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-31 Basalt -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-32 Basaltic Andesite -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-33 Volcanic Breccia -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-34 Lapilli tephra -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-35 Basaltic Andesite -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-36 Basalt -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-37 Andesite -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-38 Basalt -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-39 Andesite -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-4 Soil -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-40 Basalt -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-41 Dacite debris flow -- 9 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-42 Dacite debris flow -- 9 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-43 Andesite debris flow -- 9 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-44 Basaltic Andesite -- 11 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-5 Lapilli tephra -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-6 Debris flow -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-7 Debris flow -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-8 Basalt lapilli tephra -- 8 Sep 2015
NMNH 118207-9 Basaltic andesite lapilli tephra -- 8 Sep 2015

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