St. Paul Island

Photo of this volcano
  • United States
  • Alaska
  • Shield
  • 1280 BCE
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 57.18°N
  • 170.3°W

  • 203 m
    666 ft

  • 314010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for St. Paul Island.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for St. Paul Island.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for St. Paul Island.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1943 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain     Several km SW of St. Paul
1280 BCE ± 40 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) West side (Fox Hill)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Lake-filled Crater Hill on the western side of St. Paul is one of many craters dotting the island. Reindeer (caribou) can be seen wading along the shores of the lake. St. Paul is the largest of the Pribilof Islands and consists of a 110 sq km area of coalescing small basaltic shield volcanoes capped by a central cinder cone. The Fox Hill lava flow at the far western end of the island is estimated to be only a few thousand years old.

Photo by V.B. Scheffer (published in U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1028-F).
See title for photo information.
Crater Hill on the western side of St. Paul is one of many pyroclastic cones dotting the island. The crater, which contains an elongated lake, is seen here from the NE. St. Paul, the largest of the Pribilof Islands, consists of a 110 sq km area of coalescing small basaltic shield volcanoes capped by a central cinder cone. The Fox Hill lava flow at the far western end of the island is estimated to be only a few thousand years old.

Photo by Art Sowls, 1988 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).
See title for photo information.
A Space Shuttle image of St. Paul Island shows Northeast Point at the upper right, Reef Point at the bottom-center, and Southwest Point at the left. Snow-covered Big Lake lies SW of Northeast Point, Bogoslof Hill near the center of the island, and Rush Hill is the cone along the NW coast. Rush Hill produced lava flows from NE-trending fissures. The 110 sq km island is the largest of the Pribilof Islands and contains more than a dozen basaltic cinder cones and associated lava flows.

NASA Space Shuttle image STS099-728-21, 2000 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


The following 3 samples associated with this volcano can be found in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections. Catalog number links will open a window with more information.

Catalog Number Sample Description
NMNH 62988-1 Lava
NMNH 62988-2 Lava
NMNH 88358 Bomb

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