Tecuamburro

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.156°N
  • 90.407°W

  • 1845 m
    6052 ft

  • 342120
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Tecuamburro.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Tecuamburro.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Tecuamburro.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0960 BCE ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) NW flank (Ixpaco Crater)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Tecuamburro, seen here from the north, is a small, forested stratovolcano or lava-dome complex of mostly Pleistocene age. The smoother, left-hand side of the elongated volcano consists of younger lava domes that were constructed during the late Pleistocene or early Holocene within a horseshoe-shaped, east-facing caldera. The caldera resulted from structural failure of the older Miraflores stratovolcano (right). A phreatic tuff ring on the NW flank, Laguna Ixpaco, is of Holocene age, and is still fumarolically active.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Tecuamburro, seen here from the SE on the Pacific coastal plain, is a small, forested stratovolcano or lava-dome complex of mostly Pleistocene age. Tecuamburro and other lava domes forming the right-hand peaks were constructed during the late Pleistocene or early Holocene within a horseshoe-shaped, east-facing caldera. The caldera resulted from structural failure of the older Miraflores stratovolcano on the left. The latest dated eruption from Tecuamburro formed Laguna Ixpaco, a phreatic tuff ring on the NW flank, about 2900 years ago.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The low ridge on the left-hand horizon is the southern rim of a large horseshoe-shaped caldera left by collapse of Miraflores, an andesitic ancestral stratovolcano of the Tecuamburro volcanic complex. Miraflores volcano was formed about 100,000 years ago and collapsed sometime prior to 38,000 years ago. The forested peak at the upper right is part of the compound Tecuamburro lava-dome complex, which was constructed within the collapse scarp.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The summit lava-dome complex of Tecuamburro volcano is seen here from the NE along the road from Cuilapa. Four adjacent NW-SE-trending lava domes, the SE-most (left-center) of which is Tecuamburro proper, were erupted within a large horseshoe-shaped crater left by collapse of an ancestral volcano. These domes were erupted less than 38,000 years ago. The Tecuamburro complex was constructed within a 20-km-wide graben whose northern margin terminates against the major regional Jalpatagua fault.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Ixpaco crater, a 1-km-wide tuff ring on the NW flank of Tecuamburro volcano, was formed during an explosive eruption about 2900 years ago. This marks the youngest dated eruption of the Tecuamburro volcanic complex. An acidic lake fills the tuff ring, and fumaroles, acid-sulfate hot springs, and mud pots occur around the lake. Colloidal sulfur turns the lake a milky green color. This view is from the north with the forested lava domes of Cerro Miraflores (left) and Cerro Pena Blanca (right) in the background.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The Tecuamburro volcanic complex has a diverse history. Collapse of the ancestral Pleistocene Miraflores volcano created a large horseshoe-shaped caldera open to the east, producing an avalanche deposit that traveled across the Río los Esclavos (right). The modern Tecuamburro complex, consisting of four andesitic lava domes, was constructed within this scarp. The Laguna Ixpaco crater was created about 2900 years ago within the much larger Chupadero crater of Pleistocene age.

NASA Landsat image, 2000 (courtesy of Loren Siebert, University of Akron).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Tecuamburro in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites