Tecuamburro

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.156°N
  • 90.407°W

  • 1845 m
    6052 ft

  • 342120
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Tecuamburro.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Tecuamburro.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Tecuamburro.

Tecuamburro is a small, forested stratovolcano or large lava-dome complex of mostly Pleistocene age. It is located about 50 km ESE of Guatemala City, about 20 km south of the main volcanic chain. An ancestral andesitic stratovolcano, Miraflores, was formed about 100,000 years ago. Tecuamburro and other lava domes were constructed during the late Pleistocene or early Holocene within a horseshoe-shaped, east-facing caldera produced by structural failure of the older Miraflores stratovolcano prior to about 38,000 years ago. One of the largest of these domes, Peña Blanca, overtops the NW rim of the collapse scarp. Two nested craters, the larger of which is Chupadero, lie at the NW end of the complex. The smaller crater is a phreatic tuff ring, Laguna Ixpaco, that was formed about 2900 years ago during the latest dated eruption of the Tecuamburro complex. Numerous fumaroles, hot springs, and boiling mud pots are found in the area around the acidic lake. No historical eruptions are known from Tecuamburro.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0960 BCE ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) NW flank (Ixpaco Crater)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Cones

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Ixpaco, Laguna Tuff ring 1110 m 14° 11' 28" N 90° 25' 30" W
Miraflores Stratovolcano 1945 m 14° 9' 25" N 90° 25' 59" W
Perla, La Stratovolcano 14° 10' 0" N 90° 25' 0" W

Craters

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Chupadero Crater 1110 m 14° 12' 0" N 90° 26' 0" W

Domes

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Peña Blanca, Cerro Dome 1840 m 14° 9' 40" N 90° 25' 0" W
San Francisco Dome 1555 m 14° 9' 0" N 90° 25' 0" W
Soledad, Cerro la Dome 1845 m 14° 9' 22" N 90° 24' 25" W

Thermal

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Azufral Thermal 1440 m 14° 9' 7" N 90° 24' 50" W
Tecuamburro, seen here from the north, is a small, forested stratovolcano or lava-dome complex of mostly Pleistocene age. The smoother, left-hand side of the elongated volcano consists of younger lava domes that were constructed during the late Pleistocene or early Holocene within a horseshoe-shaped, east-facing caldera. The caldera resulted from structural failure of the older Miraflores stratovolcano (right). A phreatic tuff ring on the NW flank, Laguna Ixpaco, is of Holocene age, and is still fumarolically active.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
Tecuamburro, seen here from the SE on the Pacific coastal plain, is a small, forested stratovolcano or lava-dome complex of mostly Pleistocene age. Tecuamburro and other lava domes forming the right-hand peaks were constructed during the late Pleistocene or early Holocene within a horseshoe-shaped, east-facing caldera. The caldera resulted from structural failure of the older Miraflores stratovolcano on the left. The latest dated eruption from Tecuamburro formed Laguna Ixpaco, a phreatic tuff ring on the NW flank, about 2900 years ago.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
The low ridge on the left-hand horizon is the southern rim of a large horseshoe-shaped caldera left by collapse of Miraflores, an andesitic ancestral stratovolcano of the Tecuamburro volcanic complex. Miraflores volcano was formed about 100,000 years ago and collapsed sometime prior to 38,000 years ago. The forested peak at the upper right is part of the compound Tecuamburro lava-dome complex, which was constructed within the collapse scarp.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
The summit lava-dome complex of Tecuamburro volcano is seen here from the NE along the road from Cuilapa. Four adjacent NW-SE-trending lava domes, the SE-most (left-center) of which is Tecuamburro proper, were erupted within a large horseshoe-shaped crater left by collapse of an ancestral volcano. These domes were erupted less than 38,000 years ago. The Tecuamburro complex was constructed within a 20-km-wide graben whose northern margin terminates against the major regional Jalpatagua fault.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
Ixpaco crater, a 1-km-wide tuff ring on the NW flank of Tecuamburro volcano, was formed during an explosive eruption about 2900 years ago. This marks the youngest dated eruption of the Tecuamburro volcanic complex. An acidic lake fills the tuff ring, and fumaroles, acid-sulfate hot springs, and mud pots occur around the lake. Colloidal sulfur turns the lake a milky green color. This view is from the north with the forested lava domes of Cerro Miraflores (left) and Cerro Pena Blanca (right) in the background.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
The Tecuamburro volcanic complex has a diverse history. Collapse of the ancestral Pleistocene Miraflores volcano created a large horseshoe-shaped caldera open to the east, producing an avalanche deposit that traveled across the Río los Esclavos (right). The modern Tecuamburro complex, consisting of four andesitic lava domes, was constructed within this scarp. The Laguna Ixpaco crater was created about 2900 years ago within the much larger Chupadero crater of Pleistocene age.

NASA Landsat image, 2000 (courtesy of Loren Siebert, University of Akron).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Cameron B I, Walker J A, Carr M J, Patino L C, Matias O, Feigenson M D, 2003. Flux versus decompression melting at stratovolcanoes in southeastern Guatemala. J Volc Geotherm Res, 119: 21-50.

Carr M J, 1984. Symmetrical and segmented variation of physical and geochemical characterisitics of the Central American volcanic front. J Volc Geotherm Res, 20: 231-252.

Duffield W A, 2001. At least Noah had some warning. Eos, Trans Amer Geophys Union, 82: 305, 309.

Duffield W A, Heiken G H, Wohletz K H, Maassen L W, Dengo G, Mckee E H, 1989. Geology and geothermal potential of the Tecuamburro volcano area of Guatemala. Trans Geotherm Res Council, 13: 125-131.

Duffield W A, Heiken G H, Wohletz K H, Maassen L W, Dengo G, Pinzon O, 1991. Geologic map of Tecuamburro volcano and surrounding area, Guatemala. U S Geol Surv Map, I-2197, 1:50,000 geol map.

Goff S J, Goff F, Janik C J, 1992. Tecuamburro volcano, Guatemala: exploration geothermal gradient drilling and results. Geothermics, 21: 483-502.

Heiken G, Duffield W, 1990. An evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Tecuamburro volcano area of Guatemala. Central Amer Energy Resour Project, LA-11906-MS, Los Alamos Natl Lab, Los Alamos, NM 87545, 37 p.

Janik C J, Goff F, Fahlquist L, Adams A I, Roldan-M A, Chipera S J, Trujillo P E, Counce D, 1992. Hydrogeochemical exploration of geothermal prospects in the Tecuamburro volcano region, Guatemala. Geothermics, 21: 447-481.

Mooser F, Meyer-Abich H, McBirney A R, 1958. Central America. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 6: 1-146.

Sapper K, 1925. The Volcanoes of Central America. Halle: Verlag Max Niemeyer, 144 p.

Siebert L, Alvarado G E, Vallance J W, van Wyk de Vries B, 2006. Large-volume volcanic edifice failures in Central America and associated hazards. In: Rose W I, Bluth G J S, Carr M J, Ewert J W, Patino L C, Vallance J W (eds), Volcanic hazards in Central America, {Geol Soc Amer Spec Pap}, 412: 1-26.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano
Lava dome(s)
Tuff ring

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite
Minor
Dacite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
1,939
29,560
313,834
6,874,746

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Tecuamburro Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.