Moyuta

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.03°N
  • 90.1°W

  • 1662 m
    5451 ft

  • 342130
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Moyuta.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Moyuta.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Moyuta.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Moyuta. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Moyuta page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Moyuta volcano, seen here on the left-center horizon from the NW, is the easternmost of a chain of large stratovolcanoes extending across Guatemala. Its flat-topped summit is formed by a cluster of lava domes. Lava flows from the volcano interfinger with lacustrine deposits in the Jalpatagua valley, partly covered by the cloud bank below the volcano. The volcano lies south of the NW-SE-trending Jalpatagua Fault and overtops the southern margin of the Jalpatagua Graben, which lies on trend with the medial graben of El Salvador.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
This view from the south shows a forested lava dome, one of a cluster of at least three steep-sided, coalescing andesitic-to-dacitic domes forming the summit of Moyuta volcano. The age of the domes is not known, but they are considered to be relatively recent features. The town of Moyuta, the outskirts of which are seen in the center of the photo, was constructed high on the volcano immediately adjacent to the summit dome complex.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Moyuta volcano rises above farmlands on the Pacific coastal plain of Guatemala. The densely forested volcano is extensively dissected and is mostly of Pliocene and Pleistocene age, but has a cluster of relatively youthful andesitic-to-dacitic lava domes at its summit. North-trending faults cut the summit area and form step-like ridges. Fumaroles, acid springs, and bicarbonate-rich hot springs are located on the northern and southern flanks of the volcano.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Moyuta is the easternmost of a chain of large stratovolcanoes extending along the volcanic front of Guatemala. The summit of the 1662-m-high volcano contains a cluster of forested lava domes. It is viewed here from a small lake to its SW at the edge of the Pacific coastal plain. The age of the latest eruption of Moyuta volcano is not known.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The large forested area at the middle right is the 1662-m-high Moyuta volcanic complex, its summit composed of a series of overlapping andesitic lava domes. The small white-colored area above and to the right of the dome complex is the city of Moyuta, which lies at an altitude of nearly 1300 m. Moyuta is the easternmost of the chain of large stratovolcanoes stretching across the Guatemalan Highlands.

NASA Landsat image, 2000 (courtesy of Loren Siebert, University of Akron).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Moyuta in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites