Ipala

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.55°N
  • 89.63°W

  • 1650 m
    5412 ft

  • 342190
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Ipala.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Ipala.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Ipala.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Ipala. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Ipala page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Ipala is part of a cluster of closely spaced small stratovolcanoes and cinder cone fields in SE Guatemala. The summit of the 1650-m-high stratovolcano is cut by a 1-km-wide crater containing a lake. The eastern flank of the small stratovolcano, seen here from the SW, is cut by a line of Holocene cinder cones and lava flows. Monte Rico is the prominent cinder cone on the south flank (right skyline). No historical eruptions are known from Ipala.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1993 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Ipala is a small but prominent stratovolcano that rises about 750 m above the floor of the Ipala graben. The volcano extends nearly across the full width of the graben. The prominent satellitic cone in the shadow at the right is Monte Rico, on the southern flank of the volcano. The eastern flank of Ipala is cut by a 17-km long, NNE-SSW-trending fissure that produced a conspicuous line of Holocene cinder cones and lava flows, out of view to the right.

Photo by Giuseppina Kysar, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Volcanic dikes of varying orientation cut oxidized reddish scoria in a quarried cinder cone near the village of Agua Blanca. Several generations of thin dikes are visible (note people at the lower left for scale). The larger dike supporting the pinnacle at the left-center is oriented north-south, parallel to the direction of faults defining the Ipala graben.

Photo by Giuseppina Kysar, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Ipala in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites