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Llullaillaco

Photo of this volcano
  • Chile-Argentina
  • South America
  • Stratovolcano
  • 1877 CE
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 24.72°S
  • 68.53°W

  • 6739 m
    22104 ft

  • 355110
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Llullaillaco.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Llullaillaco.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Llullaillaco.

The Global Volcanism Program has no synonyms or subfeatures listed for Llullaillaco.

Eruptive History

There is data available for 3 Holocene eruptive periods.

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1877 May Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1868 Sep Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations
1854 Feb 10 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
Deformation History

There is no Deformation History data available for Llullaillaco.

Emission History

There is no Emissions History data available for Llullaillaco.

Photo Gallery

The world's highest historically active volcano, 6739-m-high Llullaillaco, sits astride the Chile-Argentina border. The summit, seen here from the NE, is formed by a smaller well-preserved cone that was constructed on an older edifice dating back to the early Pleistocene. A major debris-avalanche deposit produced by collapse of the older volcano extends eastward into Argentina. Growth of the modern cone was completed with the emplacement of a series of young lava flows down the northern and southern flanks.

Photo by Carlos Felipe Ramírez, courtesy of Oscar González-Ferrán (University of Chile).
See title for photo information.
The world's highest historically active volcano, 6739-m-high Llullaillaco, sits astride the Chile-Argentina border in this NASA Space Shuttle image (with north to the upper right). A well-preserved summit cone was the source of prominent lava flows that are older than they appear in this image. The hilly terrain at the lower right was produced by a major debris avalanche about 150,000 years ago that swept eastward into Argentina and diverges around the north and south sides of the older Cerro Rosado stratovolcano (extreme lower right).

NASA Space Station image ISS006-E-13814, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
See title for photo information.
The snow-mantled surface of Llullaillaco volcano is seen in this NASA Space Shuttle image (with north to the upper left). The two youthful looking lava flows with prominent flow levees descending the northern and western flanks of the volcano appeared to be of Holocene, but Ar/Ar dating showed them to be of late-Pleistocene age. The 6739-m-high Llullaillaco is the world's highest historically active volcano.

NASA Space Station image ISS006-E-13814, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
See title for photo information.
GVP Map Holdings

The maps shown below have been scanned from the GVP map archives and include the volcano on this page. Clicking on the small images will load the full 300 dpi map. Very small-scale maps (such as world maps) are not included. The maps database originated over 30 years ago, but was only recently updated and connected to our main database. We welcome users to tell us if they see incorrect information or other problems with the maps; please use the Contact GVP link at the bottom of the page to send us email.

Title: Argentina, Chile
Publisher: DMA Aerospace Center
Country: Argentina, Chile
Year: 1989
Series: ONC
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:1,000,000
Map of Argentina, Chile
Title: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay
Publisher: DMA Aerospace Center
Country: S America
Year: 1981
Series: ONC
Map Type: Navigation
Scale: 1:1,000,000
Map of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay
Smithsonian Sample Collections Database

There are no samples for Llullaillaco in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

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