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San José

Photo of this volcano
  • Chile-Argentina
  • South America
  • Stratovolcano(es)
  • 1960 CE
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 33.789°S
  • 69.895°W

  • 6070 m
    19915 ft

  • 357020
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Bulletin Report: May 1991 (BGVN 16:05) Citation IconCite this Report

New fumarole field on upper S flank

A new fumarole field, 150 m below the rim on the S flank . . . was first observed in late February (figures 1 and 2). On 14 May, geologists from the Univ de Chile noted that the new activity was similar to that of earlier fumaroles associated with a small andesitic dome within the central crater.

Figure (see Caption) Figure 1.Sketch of view looking E at the San José complex, 14 May 1991. Vapor rises from within the crater and from the February 1991 fumarole field. Courtesy of O. González-Ferrán.
Figure (see Caption) Figure 2. Sketch map showing the summit region and craters of the San José complex, May 1991. Courtesy of O. González-Ferrán.

Although no earthquakes were detected at the volcano, an increase in seismicity was recorded by the Univ de Chile's seismic network throughout the roughly N-S fault zone that separates the Valle Central and the Cordillera Andina. Four events were recorded in February, 8 in March, 9 in April, and 14 in May, the largest (M 4.0 and M 3.5) on 8 and 11 April, respectively (figure 3).

Figure (see Caption) Figure 3. Sketch showing the location of San José and the epicenters of two large earthquakes, April 1991. Courtesy of O. González-Ferrán.

Information Contacts: O. González-Ferrán, Univ de Chile; P. Acevedo, Univ de la Frontera, Temuco.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for San José.

Bulletin Reports - Index

Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

05/1991 (BGVN 16:05) New fumarole field on upper S flank




Information is preliminary and subject to change. All times are local (unless otherwise noted)


May 1991 (BGVN 16:05) Citation IconCite this Report

New fumarole field on upper S flank

A new fumarole field, 150 m below the rim on the S flank . . . was first observed in late February (figures 1 and 2). On 14 May, geologists from the Univ de Chile noted that the new activity was similar to that of earlier fumaroles associated with a small andesitic dome within the central crater.

Figure (see Caption) Figure 1.Sketch of view looking E at the San José complex, 14 May 1991. Vapor rises from within the crater and from the February 1991 fumarole field. Courtesy of O. González-Ferrán.
Figure (see Caption) Figure 2. Sketch map showing the summit region and craters of the San José complex, May 1991. Courtesy of O. González-Ferrán.

Although no earthquakes were detected at the volcano, an increase in seismicity was recorded by the Univ de Chile's seismic network throughout the roughly N-S fault zone that separates the Valle Central and the Cordillera Andina. Four events were recorded in February, 8 in March, 9 in April, and 14 in May, the largest (M 4.0 and M 3.5) on 8 and 11 April, respectively (figure 3).

Figure (see Caption) Figure 3. Sketch showing the location of San José and the epicenters of two large earthquakes, April 1991. Courtesy of O. González-Ferrán.

Information Contacts: O. González-Ferrán, Univ de Chile; P. Acevedo, Univ de la Frontera, Temuco.

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Eruptive History

There is data available for 9 Holocene eruptive periods.

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1960 Jul 2 ± 182 days Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1959 Jul 2 ± 182 days Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1941 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1931 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
1895 1897 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1889 1890 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1881 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1838 Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1822 Nov 19 1838 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
Deformation History

There is no Deformation History data available for San José.

Emission History

There is no Emissions History data available for San José.

Photo Gallery

Volcán San José on the far left horizon rises to the north above ice pinnacles at the Nieves Negras pass on the Chile/Argentina border. The summit of San José is formed by a cluster of six Holocene craters, pyroclastic cones, and blocky lava flows that lie within a series of elongated, 0.5 x 2 km wide nested craters. Mild phreatomagmatic eruptions were recorded at San José in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Photo courtesy of Oscar González-Ferrán (University of Chile).
See title for photo information.
GVP Map Holdings

The maps shown below have been scanned from the GVP map archives and include the volcano on this page. Clicking on the small images will load the full 300 dpi map. Very small-scale maps (such as world maps) are not included. The maps database originated over 30 years ago, but was only recently updated and connected to our main database. We welcome users to tell us if they see incorrect information or other problems with the maps; please use the Contact GVP link at the bottom of the page to send us email.

Title: Argentina, Chile
Publisher: DMA Aerospace Center
Country: S America
Year: 1978
Series: ONC
Map Type: Navigation
Scale: 1:1,000,000
Map of Argentina, Chile
Smithsonian Sample Collections Database

There are no samples for San José in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites