Osorno

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 41.1°S
  • 72.493°W

  • 2652 m
    8699 ft

  • 358010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Osorno.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Osorno.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Osorno.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1869 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1855 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1852 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
1851 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1837 Nov 7 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1834 Nov 29 1835 Feb 24 ± 4 days Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Summit & SSW side (Negrillar de Ensenada)
1790 Mar 9 1791 Dec 26 ± 5 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations SE base
1765 ± 14 years Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1719 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1644 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1640 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1575 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1310 ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
1220 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
0910 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
0420 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
0210 BCE ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
1710 BCE ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


The symmetrical, glacier-clad Osorno stratovolcano forms a renowned landmark between Todos Los Santos and Llanguihue lakes. It is seen here from the north, with Calbuco volcano visible at the extreme right. The 2652-m-high Osorno is one of the most active volcanoes of the southern Chilean Andes. Flank scoria cones and fissure vents, primarily on the west and SW sides, have produced lava flows that reached Lago Llanguihue. Historical eruptions have originated from both summit and flank vents.

Photo by Hugo Moreno (University of Chile).
See title for photo information.
A field of fresh-looking, unvegetated lava flows blankets the SW flank of Osorno volcano. Prominent flow levees mark channels of individual flow lobes. Some of these lava flows were erupted from cinder cones on the SSW flank of Osorno in 1835. Explosive activity beginning on November 29, 1834 was followed by lava effusion starting January 19, 1835 that lasted until the end of February.

Photo by Hugo Moreno (University of Chile).
See title for photo information.
Along with its neighbor Osorno (upper left), Calbuco is one of the most active volcanoes of the southern Chilean Andes. The summit of Calbuco, seen at the left in this view from the SW, is the remnant of an older volcano that collapsed during the late Pleistocene, producing a debris avalanche that swept NNW into Lake Llanquihue. The smooth, snow-covered summit at the right is a young, historical lava-dome complex that postdates one of the largest historical eruptions in southern Chile during 1893-1894.

Photo by Hugo Moreno (University of Chile).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Osorno in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites