Snaefellsjokull

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 64.8°N
  • 23.783°W

  • 1446 m
    4743 ft

  • 370010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Snaefellsjokull.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Snaefellsjokull.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Snaefellsjokull.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0200 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Tephra layer Sn-1
1000 BCE ± 500 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Radiocarbon (uncorrected) NW flank (Raudhólar)
2010 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Tephra layer Sn-2
2270 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Radiocarbon (uncorrected) South flank (Thufuhraun)
2400 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Radiocarbon (uncorrected) NE flank (800 m)
2970 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Radiocarbon (uncorrected) SE flank (Dagverdarahraun)
4050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Tephrochronology West flank (Ondverdarnesholar)
4550 BCE ± 1500 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology East of Snaefellsjökull (Budaklettur)
6050 BCE ± 1000 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Tephra layer Sn-3
8460 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


The low Budaklettur scoria cone on the east flank of Snæfellsjökull in western Iceland was the source of the Budahraun lava field, which forms a flat, low-lying peninsula. The eruption occurred sometime between about 5000 and 8000 years ago. Youthful, Holocene lava flows form much of the coastline surrounding Snæfellsjökull volcano.

Photo by Richie Williams, 1981 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
Lysuhöll, Iceland's smallest volcanic system, consists of a chain of small cinder cones and vents along a WNW-ESE line cutting diagonally across the Snæfellsnes Peninsula in the center of the photo. The cones and vents of the Lysuhöll volcanic system, seen here from the ENE, are located between the snow-covered Helgrindur mountains in the foreground and the glacier-covered Snæfellsjökull volcano in the background. The latest eruptions from Lysuhöll occurred during the Holocene.

Photo by Thorvaldur Bragason, Iceland Geodetic Survey (courtesy of Richie Williams, U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
Ice-clad Snæfellsjökull volcano towers above Breidavík bay at the western tip of the isolated Snæfellsnes Peninsula in western Iceland. Numerous pyroclastic cones dot the flanks of the 1448-m-high stratovolcano, which is the only large central volcano in this part of Iceland. Holocene lava flows extend to the sea over the entire western half of the volcano. One young flow that reached the coast on the eastern flank can be seen at the left side of the photo. The latest dated eruption took place about 1750 years ago; several lava flows may be even younger.

Photo by Richie Williams, 1979 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Snaefellsjokull in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites