Tenerife

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
  Google Earth Placemark
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 28.271°N
  • 16.641°W

  • 3715 m
    12185 ft

  • 383030
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Weekly Report: 12 May-18 May 2004


Local volcanologists reported that there was increased seismicity at Tenerife in mid-May, according to a news article. The article stated that during several days before 18 May there were "five successive low-intensity earthquakes in the island's most volcanically active zone in the area between Mont Teide and Santiago del Teide." The director of the Estación Vulcanológica de Canarias stated that the earthquakes, which were less than M 2, could be an early sign that something unusual was happening at the volcano.

Source: Yorkshire Post Today News


Most Recent Bulletin Report: February 2006 (BGVN 31:02)


2004 seismic crisis; January 2005 escalation in monitored parameters at Tiede

Juan Carlos Carracedo notified Bulletin editors that seismic activity in Tenerife during April and May 2004 was not followed by any volcanic activity. More than 200 earthquakes from magnitude 1 to 3 were recorded, but residents felt only three of them. Most of the epicenters were localized around the NW rift zone of Tenerife and in the strait between Gran Canaria and Tenerife. The crisis was probably related to dike emplacement at 3-4 km depth.

On 12 January 2005, an increase in unrest at Tenerife's Teide volcano over the previous 2 weeks was reported. Carbon dioxide emissions rose from 75 to 354 tons per day, and hydrogen sulfide emissions rose from 35 to 152 tons per day. Seismic activity remained elevated under the volcano. Fumaroles increased in pressure, and emitted sounds. No significant ground deformation was observed.

In a recent article in Eos, scientists from Spain and The Netherlands (Garcia et al., 2006), described a monitoring program for the Canary Islands. They noted that the Canary Islands started to show signs of seismo-volcanic activity at the end of 2003. In spring 2004, there was a significant increase in the number of seismic events (a mixture of regional, volcano-tectonic, and volcanic events such as tremor and long-period signals) located beneath Tenerife Island. The authors also noted an increase of fumarolic activity, an increase in carbon dioxide emissions in the NW part of the island, and changes in the gravimetric field on the N flank. After several seismic events had been felt by the population, the first alert level was declared by the civil protection division of the local government.

The volcano has a history of large eruptions destructive to populated areas. The authors reported that in 1992, the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI) identified Teide, with its high-risk level, as one of the European Laboratory Volcanoes, thus receiving special consideration from the European Union concerning research proposals.

In the spring of 2005, the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) initiated the TEGETEIDE project (Geophysical and Geodetic Techniques for the Study of the Teide-Pico Active Volcanic Area). It will monitor the seismicity of the volcano and include background noise analysis. The system's main goal is to detect precursors to a potentially dangerous eruptive episode at an early stage. The scheme is to use signals in both the time and the spectral domains.

References. Garcia, A., Vila, J., Ortiz, R., Macia, R., Sleeman, R., Marrero, J.M., Sanchez, N., Tarraga, M., Correig, A.M., 2006, Monitoring the reawakening of Canary Islands' Teide Volcano: EOS Transactions, American Geophysical Union, v. 87, no. 6, p. 61, 65.

Information Contacts: Juan Carlos Carracedo, Estación Volcanológica de Canarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC, Spanish National Research Council), Serrano, 117 28006, Madrid, Spain (Email: jcarracedo@ipna.csic.es); Josep Vila, Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia, Universitat de Barcelona and Laboratori d'Estudis Geofísics "Eduard Fontserè," Institut d'Estudis Catalans, Barcelona, Spain (Email: jvila@am.ub.es).

Index of Weekly Reports


2004: May

Weekly Reports


12 May-18 May 2004

Local volcanologists reported that there was increased seismicity at Tenerife in mid-May, according to a news article. The article stated that during several days before 18 May there were "five successive low-intensity earthquakes in the island's most volcanically active zone in the area between Mont Teide and Santiago del Teide." The director of the Estación Vulcanológica de Canarias stated that the earthquakes, which were less than M 2, could be an early sign that something unusual was happening at the volcano.

Source: Yorkshire Post Today News


Index of Bulletin Reports


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

02/2006 (BGVN 31:02) 2004 seismic crisis; January 2005 escalation in monitored parameters at Tiede




Bulletin Reports

All information contained in these reports is preliminary and subject to change.


02/2006 (BGVN 31:02) 2004 seismic crisis; January 2005 escalation in monitored parameters at Tiede

Juan Carlos Carracedo notified Bulletin editors that seismic activity in Tenerife during April and May 2004 was not followed by any volcanic activity. More than 200 earthquakes from magnitude 1 to 3 were recorded, but residents felt only three of them. Most of the epicenters were localized around the NW rift zone of Tenerife and in the strait between Gran Canaria and Tenerife. The crisis was probably related to dike emplacement at 3-4 km depth.

On 12 January 2005, an increase in unrest at Tenerife's Teide volcano over the previous 2 weeks was reported. Carbon dioxide emissions rose from 75 to 354 tons per day, and hydrogen sulfide emissions rose from 35 to 152 tons per day. Seismic activity remained elevated under the volcano. Fumaroles increased in pressure, and emitted sounds. No significant ground deformation was observed.

In a recent article in Eos, scientists from Spain and The Netherlands (Garcia et al., 2006), described a monitoring program for the Canary Islands. They noted that the Canary Islands started to show signs of seismo-volcanic activity at the end of 2003. In spring 2004, there was a significant increase in the number of seismic events (a mixture of regional, volcano-tectonic, and volcanic events such as tremor and long-period signals) located beneath Tenerife Island. The authors also noted an increase of fumarolic activity, an increase in carbon dioxide emissions in the NW part of the island, and changes in the gravimetric field on the N flank. After several seismic events had been felt by the population, the first alert level was declared by the civil protection division of the local government.

The volcano has a history of large eruptions destructive to populated areas. The authors reported that in 1992, the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI) identified Teide, with its high-risk level, as one of the European Laboratory Volcanoes, thus receiving special consideration from the European Union concerning research proposals.

In the spring of 2005, the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) initiated the TEGETEIDE project (Geophysical and Geodetic Techniques for the Study of the Teide-Pico Active Volcanic Area). It will monitor the seismicity of the volcano and include background noise analysis. The system's main goal is to detect precursors to a potentially dangerous eruptive episode at an early stage. The scheme is to use signals in both the time and the spectral domains.

References. Garcia, A., Vila, J., Ortiz, R., Macia, R., Sleeman, R., Marrero, J.M., Sanchez, N., Tarraga, M., Correig, A.M., 2006, Monitoring the reawakening of Canary Islands' Teide Volcano: EOS Transactions, American Geophysical Union, v. 87, no. 6, p. 61, 65.

Information Contacts: Juan Carlos Carracedo, Estación Volcanológica de Canarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC, Spanish National Research Council), Serrano, 117 28006, Madrid, Spain (Email: jcarracedo@ipna.csic.es); Josep Vila, Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia, Universitat de Barcelona and Laboratori d'Estudis Geofísics "Eduard Fontserè," Institut d'Estudis Catalans, Barcelona, Spain (Email: jvila@am.ub.es).

The large triangular island of Tenerife is composed of a complex of overlapping Miocene-to-Quaternary stratovolcanoes that have remained active into historical time. The NE-trending Cordillera Dorsal volcanic massif joins the Las Cañadas volcano on the SW side of Tenerife with older volcanoes, creating the largest volcanic complex of the Canary Islands. Controversy surrounds the formation of the dramatic 10 x 17 km Las Cañadas caldera, which is partially filled by 3715-m-high Teide stratovolcano, the highest peak in the Atlantic Ocean. The origin of the caldera has been variably considered to be due to collapse following multiple major explosive eruptions or as a result of a massive landslide (in a manner similar to the earlier formation of the massive La Orotava and Guimar valleys), or a combination of the two processes. The most recent stage of activity beginning in the late Pleistocene included the construction of the Pico Viejo and Teide edifices. Tenerife was perhaps observed in eruption by Christopher Columbus, and several flank vents on the Canary Island's most active volcano have been active during historical time.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1909 Nov 18 1909 Nov 27 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NW rift zone (Chinyero)
1798 Jun 9 1798 Sep 14 (?) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations SW flank of Pico Viejo (Chahorra)
1706 May 5 1706 Jun 13 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NW rift zone (Garachico)
1704 Dec 31 1705 Mar 27 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NW rift zone (Siete Fuentes, Fasnia, Güímar)
1492 Aug 24 (in or before) Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations NW rift zone (Montaña Boca Cangrejo)
[ 1444 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain     Pico del Teide
[ 1430 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1396 ± 3 years ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1341 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1060 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Montaña Reventada)
0800 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Radiocarbon (corrected) Pico de Tiede
0700 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NE rift zone (Volcán Negro)
0240 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW flank of Pico Viejo (Roques Blancos)
0190 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Cuevas Negras)
0090 ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Los Hornitos)
0040 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Teide-Pico Viejo complex
0030 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW flank of Pico Viejo (Roques Blancos)
0080 BCE ± 40 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (corrected) Montaña Blanca, Pico Viejo
0520 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Teide-Pico Viejo complex
0580 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW flank of Teide (El Boquerón)
0670 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Volcán el Ciego)
1050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña de Cascajo)
1150 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide SW flank (Los Gemelos)
1400 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña Samara)
1650 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide SW flank (La Mancha Ruana)
1700 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña Botija)
1980 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Montaña de Chío)
2250 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide SE flank (Montaña Majúa)
2300 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña Cruz de Tea)
2650 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Las Montañetas Negras)
2850 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide SE flank (Montaña de la Cruz)
3050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña Bilma)
3450 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña Cruz)
3540 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) Teide NE flank (lower Montaña Abejera)
3750 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña del Estrucho)
3960 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) Teide NE flank (upper Montaña Abejera)
4200 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Montaña Cueve de Ratón)
4650 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide NE flank (Montañas de los Corrales)
5250 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide E flank (Montaña de los Corrales)
5550 BCE ± 1500 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide N flank (Pico Cabras)
5750 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide NE flank (Montañas de los Conejos)
6200 BCE ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Montaña Liferfe)
6550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide NNE flank (Montaña del Abrunco)
6850 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña de Abeque)
7260 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NE flank (Montaña Negra-Los Tomillos)
7550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montañas Negras)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Cones

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Abeque, Montaña de Pyroclastic cone
Angostura, Montaña de la Pyroclastic cone
Atalaya, La Cone 706 m 28° 26' 35" N 16° 27' 0" W
Bilma, Montaña Pyroclastic cone 1372 m 28° 18' 0" N 16° 47' 0" W
Boca Cangrejo Pyroclastic cone
Botija, Montaña la Pyroclastic cone
Cascajo, Montaña Pyroclastic cone
Chahorra Pyroclastic cone 2662 m 28° 15' 0" N 16° 41' 0" W
Chinyero Pyroclastic cone 1503 m 28° 17' 0" N 16° 45' 0" W
Ciego, Montaña Pyroclastic cone
Conejos, Montañas de los Vent
Corrales, Montaña Cone
Cruz de Tea, Montaña la Cone
Cruz, Montaña la Pyroclastic cone
Espárrago, El Cone
Estrecho, Montaña del Pyroclastic cone
Fasnia, Volcán de
    Almarchiga
    Roquillo, Montaña del
Pyroclastic cone 2221 m 28° 17' 0" N 16° 31' 0" W
Fraile, Montaña Cone 370 m 28° 23' 0" N 16° 34' 0" W
Gananias, Montaña Cone 386 m 28° 23' 0" N 16° 34' 0" W
Garachico, Volcán de
    Negra, Montaña
Pyroclastic cone 1402 m 28° 19' 0" N 16° 46' 0" W
Garda, Montaña Cone
Grande de Güímar, Montaña Cone 276 m 28° 19' 0" N 16° 23' 0" W
Güímar, Volcán de
    Arafo, Volcan de
    Arenas, Montaña de Las
Pyroclastic cone 1582 m 28° 20' 0" N 16° 28' 0" W
Lejas, Montaña Cone 2299 m
Liferfe, Montaña Pyroclastic cone
Mareta, La Cone
Media Montaña Cone 1227 m 28° 22' 0" N 16° 26' 0" W
Mostaza, Montaña Pyroclastic cone
Reventada, Montaña Pyroclastic cone
Siete Fuentes
    Infantes, Los
    Negra, Montaña
    Volcán, Montaña del
Pyroclastic cone 2248 m 28° 16' 0" N 16° 32' 0" W
Tabonal, El Cone
Taco, Montaña de Cone 321 m 28° 22' 0" N 16° 50' 0" W
Teide, Pico del
    Azucar, Piton de
    Pan de Azucar
Stratovolcano 3715 m 28° 16' 16" N 16° 38' 28" W
Vica, Montaña la Cone
Viejo, Pico Stratovolcano 3134 m 28° 16' 0" N 16° 40' 0" W

Craters

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Blanca, Montaña Fissure vent 2743 m 28° 16' 0" N 16° 37' 0" W
Bocas Marie Crater
Caldereta, La
    Corona, La
Crater 3715 m 28° 16' 16" N 16° 38' 28" W
Cañadas, Las Pleistocene caldera 2715 m 28° 18' 0" N 16° 37' 0" W
Chío, Montaña Fissure vent
Cordillera Dorsal Fissure vent 28° 20' 0" N 16° 35' 0" W
Cuevas Negras, Montaña Fissure vent
Cuevos del Ratón, Volcan Fissure vent
Diego Hernandez Pleistocene caldera
Guajara Pleistocene caldera
Hornitos, Los Fissure vent
Hoyo Cedro Crater
Lajas, Montañas las Fissure vent
Negras, Montañas de Fissure vent
Negras, Montañetas las Fissure vent
Samara, Montaña Fissure vent
Santiago Fissure vent
Ucanca Pleistocene caldera

Domes

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Abejera, Montaña Dome 28° 16' 0" N 16° 46' 0" W
Abrunco Dome
Boquerón, El Dome
Cabras, Picos Dome
Cruz, Montaña de la Dome
Majúa, Montaña Dome
Rajada, Montaña Dome 2509 m 28° 16' 0" N 16° 36' 0" W
Roques Blancos Dome
Tabonal Negro Dome
Teide volcano, the highest point on the island of Tenerife, towers above the scarp of the massive 600,000-year-old Orotava landslide. The light-colored area on the eastern foot of the volcano is covered by plinian tephra deposits from the Mount Blanca eruption about 2000 years ago. Tiede was constructed within the dramatic 10 x 17 km wide Las Cañadas caldera on the SW side of Tenerife. The large triangular island is composed of a complex of overlapping stratovolcanoes that have remained active into historical time.

Photo by Alexander Belousov (Institute of Volcanology, Kliuchi).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Ablay G J, Ernst G G J, Marti J, Sparks R S J, 1995. The ~2 ka subplinian eruption of Montana Blanca, Tenerife. Bull Volc, 57: 337-355.

Ablay G J, Marti J, 2000. Stratigraphy, structure, and volcanic evolution of the Pico Teide-Pico Viejo formation, Tenerife, Canary Islands. J Volc Geotherm Res, 103: 175-208.

Ablay G, Hurlimann M, 2000. Evolution of the north flank of Tenerife by recurrent giant landslides. J Volc Geotherm Res, 103: 135-159.

Ancochea E, Fuster J M, Ibarrola E, Cendrero A, Coello J, Hernan F, Cantagrel J M, Jamond C, 1990. Volcanic evolution of the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands) in the light of new K-Ar data. J Volc Geotherm Res, 44: 231-249.

Ancochea E, Huertas M J, Cantagrel J M, Coello J, Fuster J M, Arnaud N, Ibarrola E, 1999. Evolution of the Canadas edifice and its implications for the origin of the Canadas caldera (Tenerife, Canary Islands). J Volc Geotherm Res, 88: 177-199.

Brown R J, Barry T L, Branney M J, Pringle M S, Bryan S E, 2003. The Quaternary pyroclastic succession of southeast Tenerife, Canary Islands: explosive eruptions, related caldera subsidence, and sector collapse. Geol Mag, 140: 265-288.

Brown R J, Branney M J, 2004. Event-stratigraphy of a caldera-forming ignimbrite eruption on Tenerife: the 273 ka Poris Formation. Bull Volc, 66: 392-416.

Bryan S E, 2006. Petrology and geochemistry of the Quaternary caldera-forming, phonolitic Granadilla eruption, Tenerife (Canary Islands). J Petr, 47: 1557-1589.

Bryan S E, Cas R A F, Marti J, 2000. The 0.57 Ma plinian eruption of the Granadilla Member, Tenerife (Canary Islands): an example of the complexity in eruption dynamics and evolution. J Volc Geotherm Res, 103: 209-238.

Carracedo J C, 1994. The Canary Islands: an example of structural control on the growth of large oceanic-island volcanoes. J Volc Geotherm Res, 60: 225-241.

Carracedo J C, 2006. El Volcan Teide, Volcanologia, Interpretacion de Paisajes e Itinerarios Comentados. CajaCanarias, 431 p.

Carracedo J C, Paterne M, Guillou H, Perez Torrado F J, Paris R, Rodriguex BAdiola E, Hansen A, 2003. Dataciones radiometreicas (14C y K/Ar) del Teide y el rift noroeste, Tenerife, Islas Canarias. Estudios Geol Museo Nac Ciencias Nat, 59: 15-29.

Carracedo J C, Rodriguez Badiola E, Guillou H, Paterne M, Scaillet S, Perez Torrado F J, Paris R, Fra-Paleo U, Hansen A, 2007. Eruptive and structural history of Teide volcano and rift zones of Tenerife, Canary Islands. Geol Soc Amer Bull, 119: 1027-1051.

Carracedo J C, Singer B, Jicha B, Perez Torrado F J, Guillou H, Badiola E R, Paris R, 2010. Pre-Holocene age of Humboldt's 1430 eruption of the Orotava Valley, Tenerife, Canary Islands. Geol Today, 26: 101-104.

Cas R, Edgar C J, Pittari A, Middleton J, Wolff J, Marti J, Olin P, Nichols H, 2005. Using the stratigraphic record to understand the nature of caldera collapse: the 1.59-present Las Canadas caldera complex, Tenerife, Spain. Workshop Caldera Volcanism: Analysis, Modelling and Response, Parador de las Canadas, 16-22 October, 2005, Abs, p 7-8.

Coppo N, Schnegg P-A, Heise W, Falco P, Costa R, 2008. Multiple caldera collapses from the shallow electrical resistivity signature of the Las Canadas caldera, Tenerife, Canary Islands. J Volc Geotherm Res, 170: 153-166.

del Potro R, Pinkerton H, Hurlimann M, 2009. An analysis of the morphological, geological and structural features of Teide stratovolcano, Tenerife. J Volc Geotherm Res, 181: 89-105.

Edgar C J, Wolff J A, Nichols H J, Cas R A F, Marti J, 2002. A complex Quaternary ignimbrite-forming phonolitic eruption: the Poris Member of the Diego Hernandez Formation (Tenerife, Canary Islands). J Volc Geotherm Res, 118: 99-130.

Edgar C J, Wolff J A, Olin P H, Nichols H J, Pittari A, Cas R A F, Reiners P W, Spell T L, Marti J, 2007. The late Quaternary Diego Hernandez Formation, Tenerife: volcanology of a complex cycle of voluminous explosive phonolitic eruptions. J Volc Geotherm Res, 160: 59-85.

Fuster J M, Arana V, Brandle J L, Navarro M, Alonso U, Aparicio A, 1968. Geologia y Volcanologia de las Islas Canarias - Tenerife. Madrid: Inst "Lucas Mallada", 218 p.

Huertas M J, Arnaud N O, Ancochea E, Cantagrel J M, Fuster J M, 2002. 40Ar/39Ar stratigraphy of pyroclastic units from the Canadas edifice (Tenerife, Canary Islands) and their bearing on the structural evolution. J Volc Geotherm Res, 115: 351-365.

Marti J, Gundmundsson A, 2000. The Las Canadas caldera (Tenerife, Canary Islands): an overlapping collapse caldera generated by magma-chamber migration. J Volc Geotherm Res, 103: 161-173.

Marti J, Mitjavila J, Arana V, 1994. Stratigraphy, structure and geochronology of the Las Canadas caldera (Tenerife, Canary Islands). Geol Mag, 131: 715-727.

Mitchell N C, Masson D G, Watts A B, Gee M J R, Urgeles R, 2002. The morphology of the submarine flanks of volcanic ocean islands, a comparative study of the Canary and Hawaiian hotspot islands. J Volc Geotherm Res, 115: 83-107.

Mitchell-Thome R C, 1976. Geology of the Middle Atlantic Islands. Berlin: Gebruder Borntraeger, 382 p.

Neumann van Padang M, Richards A F, Machado F, Bravo T, Baker P E, Le Maitre R W, 1967. Atlantic Ocean. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 21: 1-128.

Newhall C G, Dzurisin D, 1988. Historical unrest at large calderas of the world. U S Geol Surv Bull, 1855: 1108 p, 2 vol.

Pittari A, Cas R A F, Marti J, 2005. The occurrence and origin of prominent massive, pumice-rich ignimbrite lobes within the Late Pleistocene Abrigo Ignimbrite, Tenerife, Canary Islands. J Volc Geotherm Res, 139: 271-293.

Ridley W I, 1971. The field relations of the Canadas volcanoes, Tenerife, Canary Islands. Bull Volc, 35: 318-334.

Romero C, 1991. Las Manifestaciones Volcanicas Historicas del Archipielago Canario. Tenerife: Gobierno de Canarias, 2 vol, 695 & 768 p.

Schmincke H-U, Sumita M, 2010. Geological evolution of the Canary Islands. Koblenz: Gorres-Verlag: 188 p.

Soriano C, Galindo I, Marti J, Wolff J, 2006. Conduit-vent structures and related proximal deposits in the Las Canadas caldera, Tenerife, Canary Islands. Bull Volc, 69: 217-231.

Watts A B, Masson D G, 2001. New sonar evidence for recent catastrophic collapses of the north flank of Tenerife, Canary Islands. Bull Volc, 63: 8-19.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano
Caldera
Pyroclastic cone(s)
Lava dome(s)

Tectonic Setting

Intraplate
Oceanic crust (< 15 km)

Rock Types

Major
Phonolite
Trachybasalt / Tephrite Basanite
Phono-tephrite / Tephri-phonolite
Trachyte / Trachyandesite
Trachyandesite / Basaltic trachy-andesite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
0
156
337,660
766,276

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Tenerife Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.