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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-00456

Langila, one of the most active volcanoes of New Britain, consists of a group of four small overlapping cones on the lower eastern flank of the extinct Talawe volcano. Plumes are shown here on 4 September from Craters 2 (left) and 3 (right) during a 1970 eruption. Frequent mild-to-moderate explosive eruptions, sometimes accompanied by lava flows, have been recorded since the 19th century from the three active craters at the summit. Photo by Wally Johnson, 1970 (Australia Bureau of Mineral Resources).

Langila, one of the most active volcanoes of New Britain, consists of a group of four small overlapping cones on the lower eastern flank of the extinct Talawe volcano. Plumes are shown here on 4 September from Craters 2 (left) and 3 (right) during a 1970 eruption. Frequent mild-to-moderate explosive eruptions, sometimes accompanied by lava flows, have been recorded since the 19th century from the three active craters at the summit.

Photo by Wally Johnson, 1970 (Australia Bureau of Mineral Resources).

Keywords: plume


Langila