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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-04042

Santa Ana, El Salvador's highest volcano, is a massive, 2381-m-high stratovolcano whose summit is truncated by a series of four nested craters, seen here from the SW.   A series of parasitic vents and cones have formed along a 20-km-long fissure system that extends from the low NNE flank to the San Marcelino and Cerro Chino cinder cones on the SE flank.   Historical eruptions, largely consisting of small-to-moderate explosions from both summit and flank vents, have been recorded since the 16th century.   Photo by Mike Carr, 1982 (Rutgers University).

Santa Ana, El Salvador's highest volcano, is a massive, 2381-m-high stratovolcano whose summit is truncated by a series of four nested craters, seen here from the SW. A series of parasitic vents and cones have formed along a 20-km-long fissure system that extends from the low NNE flank to the San Marcelino and Cerro Chino cinder cones on the SE flank. Historical eruptions, largely consisting of small-to-moderate explosions from both summit and flank vents, have been recorded since the 16th century.

Photo by Mike Carr, 1982 (Rutgers University).


Santa Ana