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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-05383

Bogoslof is the summit of a largely submarine volcano located in the Bering Sea, 50 km behind the main Aleutian arc. The island is about 1.5 x 0.6 km wide and due to its frequent eruptive activity and energetic wave action, has changed shape dramatically since it was first mapped in the late 1700s. The rounded lava dome and offshore spire at the northern tip of the island (bottom-center) formed in 1992. The circular, flat area at the right is a remnant of the 1927 lava dome, and the steep pinnacle is Castle Rock, a 1796 dome remnant. Photo by Terry Keith, 1994 (Alaska Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey).

Bogoslof is the summit of a largely submarine volcano located in the Bering Sea, 50 km behind the main Aleutian arc. The island is about 1.5 x 0.6 km wide and due to its frequent eruptive activity and energetic wave action, has changed shape dramatically since it was first mapped in the late 1700s. The rounded lava dome and offshore spire at the northern tip of the island (bottom-center) formed in 1992. The circular, flat area at the right is a remnant of the 1927 lava dome, and the steep pinnacle is Castle Rock, a 1796 dome remnant.

Photo by Terry Keith, 1994 (Alaska Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey).

Keywords: island volcano | lava dome | erosion


Bogoslof