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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-05767

Ice-clad Snæfellsjökull volcano towers above Breidavík bay at the western tip of the isolated Snæfellsnes Peninsula in western Iceland.  Numerous pyroclastic cones dot the flanks of the 1448-m-high stratovolcano, which is the only large central volcano in this part of Iceland.  Holocene lava flows extend to the sea over the entire western half of the volcano.  One young flow that reached the coast on the eastern flank can be seen at the left side of the photo.  The latest dated eruption took place about 1750 years ago; several lava flows may be even younger. Photo by Richie Williams, 1979 (U.S. Geological Survey).

Ice-clad Snæfellsjökull volcano towers above Breidavík bay at the western tip of the isolated Snæfellsnes Peninsula in western Iceland. Numerous pyroclastic cones dot the flanks of the 1448-m-high stratovolcano, which is the only large central volcano in this part of Iceland. Holocene lava flows extend to the sea over the entire western half of the volcano. One young flow that reached the coast on the eastern flank can be seen at the left side of the photo. The latest dated eruption took place about 1750 years ago; several lava flows may be even younger.

Photo by Richie Williams, 1979 (U.S. Geological Survey).


Snaefellsjökull