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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-06176

Mount Erebus, seen here from the west, is Earth's southernmost historically active volcano.  The 3794-m-high peak is Antarctica's highest Quaternary volcano.  A largely filled caldera forms a flat plateau at the summit above which the modern cone was constructed.  Fang Ridge is the dark area on the NE (left) flank of Erebus, and Mount Terror, a large Pleistocene volcano on Ross Island, is visible on the left horizon. Photo by Bill Rose, 1983 (Michigan Technological University).

Mount Erebus, seen here from the west, is Earth's southernmost historically active volcano. The 3794-m-high peak is Antarctica's highest Quaternary volcano. A largely filled caldera forms a flat plateau at the summit above which the modern cone was constructed. Fang Ridge is the dark area on the NE (left) flank of Erebus, and Mount Terror, a large Pleistocene volcano on Ross Island, is visible on the left horizon.

Photo by Bill Rose, 1983 (Michigan Technological University).


Erebus