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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-08815

The western side of Mílos Island contains a cluster of lava domes. Mílos and adjacent small islands have grown from submarine and subaerial volcanism that initially was dominantly andesitic and basaltic, but ended with primarily rhyolitic eruptions. Phreatic explosions, commonly producing overlapping craters typically less than 1 km in diameter, continued from late-Pleistocene to Holocene time. Photo by Ichio Moriya (Kanazawa University).

The western side of Mílos Island contains a cluster of lava domes. Mílos and adjacent small islands have grown from submarine and subaerial volcanism that initially was dominantly andesitic and basaltic, but ended with primarily rhyolitic eruptions. Phreatic explosions, commonly producing overlapping craters typically less than 1 km in diameter, continued from late-Pleistocene to Holocene time.

Photo by Ichio Moriya (Kanazawa University).

Keywords: lava dome


Mílos