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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-11162

The small crater at the bottom-center of this Landsat image is Tullu Moje, a trachytic-to-rhyolitic pumice cone with a 700-m-wide summit crater. The northern base of the cone is covered by an obsidian lava flow. Two other obsidian flows are prominent 5 km to the north. The most recent of these silicic lava flows were erupted as recently as about 1900 CE. The same fissure system has also erupted prehistoric basaltic lava flows. The SE tip of Lake Koka lies at the upper left. The Bora-Bericcio complex is also to the upper left. NASA Landsat image, 1999 (courtesy of Hawaii Synergy Project, Univ. of Hawaii Institute of Geophysics & Planetology).

The small crater at the bottom-center of this Landsat image is Tullu Moje, a trachytic-to-rhyolitic pumice cone with a 700-m-wide summit crater. The northern base of the cone is covered by an obsidian lava flow. Two other obsidian flows are prominent 5 km to the north. The most recent of these silicic lava flows were erupted as recently as about 1900 CE. The same fissure system has also erupted prehistoric basaltic lava flows. The SE tip of Lake Koka lies at the upper left. The Bora-Bericcio complex is also to the upper left.

NASA Landsat image, 1999 (courtesy of Hawaii Synergy Project, Univ. of Hawaii Institute of Geophysics & Planetology).

Keywords: remote sensing | lava flow


Tullu Moye