La Yeguada

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 8.47°N
  • 80.82°W

  • 1297 m
    4254 ft

  • 346801
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for La Yeguada.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for La Yeguada.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for La Yeguada.

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from La Yeguada. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the La Yeguada page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

Deformation History


Information about Deformation periods will be available soon.

Emission History


There is no Emissions History data is available for La Yeguada.

Photo Gallery


The uplifted central horst of La Yeguada volcanic complex rises in the foreground with Laguna La Yeguada (center) to the west. This massive volcanic center, also known as Chitra-Calobre, lies in west-central Panamá. El Castillo (left) is the high point of the complex, and Cerro Corero de la Charca (right) is a late-Pleistocene rhyodacitic compound lava dome. The youngest feature of La Yeguada complex is the Media Luna cinder cone, which lies at the NW margin of complex, out of view to the right.

Photo by Tom Casadevall, 1994 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
The topographic high point of the fault-bounded central horst of La Yeguada volcanic complex is Cerro el Castillo (right center). It and Cerro Novillo at the lower right are part of older Miocene rocks uplifted in the horst. Quaternary volcanism took place in the northern part of the horst, out of view to the right, about 220,000 years ago. In the background are extensive Tertiary ignimbrite deposits of La Yeguada formation, some of which are thought to have originated from vents in the central horst.

Photo by Tom Casadevall, 1994 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
The vegetation-mantled slope at the center is the margin of a low-potassium basaltic lava flow erupted from the Media Luna cinder cone. The morphologically youthful flow traveled about 3 km down the Quebrada Media Luna, and diverted the stream to the northern side of the valley. Near its distal end the flow fills a broad valley, diverting the Río Chitra to the far western side of the valley. The lowest peat layer from a small lake created when the flow blocked a local drainage was radiocarbon dated at about 360 years ago.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1998 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Cerro Corero de la Charca rising above the western shore of Laguna La Yeguada is the youngest silicic feature of La Yeguada complex (also known as Chitra-Calobre). The compound 1229-m-high rhyodacitic lava dome was erupted about 220,000 years ago within a 1.5-km-wide caldera and produced pyroclastic-flow deposits that extend to the SE. This eruption occurred at the northern end of the El Castillo horst and marked its latest activity.

Photo by Paul Kimberly, 1998 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
El Castillo volcanic horst rises to the east of Laguna La Yeguada. In the center is Cerro Corero de la Charca, a rhyodacitic compound lava dome that was erupted at the northern end of the horst about 220,000 years ago within a small caldera cutting El Castillo (right horizon). The most recent activity at El Castillo occurred on its northern flanks at the intersection of major faults trending NNW, NW, and ENE. The Chitra-Colobre geothermal system at La Yeguada has been the site of extensive geothermal exploration.

Photo by Paul Kimberly, 1998 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The grassy area in the sunlight at the left center is an explosion crater formed on the SW side of El Castillo volcanic horst, whose high point forms the right horizon. The breached crater is one of the Quaternary vents formed during reactivation of the horst.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1998 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Media Luna cinder cone at the NW side of La Yeguada volcanic complex is its youngest feature. A basaltic lava flow issued from the western flank of the crater and traveled about 3 km to the west. A radiocarbon date of 360 +/- 90 years before present (BP) was obtained from sediment in a lake formed when the lava flow blocked a local drainage. A 310 +/- 80 years BP date was obtained from an apparent airfall deposit of unknown origin in Laguna la Yeguada.

Photo by Paul Kimberly, 1998 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Grass-covered Media Luna cinder cone in the center of the photo was constructed in the middle of the Media Luna valley immediately NW of the settlement of the same name. The cone contains two craters and is breached to the west. A lava flow from the base of the cone traveled about 3 km down the valley. A radiocarbon date of about 360 years ago was obtained from peat layers in a small lake formed by the flow.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1998 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for La Yeguada in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites