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Current Eruptions

Although detailed statistics are not kept on daily activity, generally there are around 20 volcanoes actively erupting at any particular time. The Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report (WVAR) for the week ending on 3 December 2019 includes the 16 volcanoes bolded and shown below in the WVAR column (rollover for report).

Overall there are 45 volcanoes with ongoing eruptions as of the Stop Dates indicated, and as reported through the last data update (1 November 2019), sorted with the most recently started eruption at the top. Information about more recently started eruptions can be found in the Weekly Report linked above.

An eruption marked as "continuing" does not always mean that the activity is continuous or happening today, but that there have been at least some intermittent eruptive events at that volcano without a break of at least 3 months since it started. An eruption listed here also might have ended since the last public data update, or at the update time a firm end date had not yet been determined due to potential renewed activity.

Volcano Country Eruption Start Date Eruption Stop Date Max VEI WVAR
Klyuchevskoy Russia 2019 Oct 24 2019 Oct 28 (continuing) Yes
Shishaldin United States 2019 Jul 23 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) Yes
Ubinas Peru 2019 Jun 24 2019 Nov 1 (continuing)
Asosan Japan 2019 Apr 16 2019 Nov 1 (continuing)
Sangay Ecuador 2019 Mar 26 2019 Nov 1 (continuing)
Poas Costa Rica 2019 Feb 7 2019 Nov 1 (continuing)
Tinakula Solomon Islands 2018 Dec 8 (in or before) 2019 Oct 10 (continuing) 2
Karangetang Indonesia 2018 Nov 25 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 2 Yes
Barren Island India 2018 Sep 25 2019 Oct 27 (continuing) 1
Krakatau Indonesia 2018 Jun 18 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 3 Yes
Merapi Indonesia 2018 May 11 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 3
Kerinci Indonesia 2018 Apr 21 2019 Oct 6 (continuing) 1
Nyamuragira DR Congo 2018 Apr 18 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 0
Mayon Philippines 2018 Jan 13 2019 Oct 22 (continuing) 2
Kadovar Papua New Guinea 2018 Jan 5 2019 Oct 17 (continuing) 2
Sangeang Api Indonesia 2017 Jul 15 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 2 Yes
Ol Doinyo Lengai Tanzania 2017 Apr 9 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 0
Aira Japan 2017 Mar 25 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 1 Yes
Sabancaya Peru 2016 Nov 6 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 3 Yes
Ebeko Russia 2016 Oct 20 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 2 Yes
Nevados de Chillan Chile 2016 Jan 8 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 2 Yes
Masaya Nicaragua 2015 Oct 3 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 1
Pacaya Guatemala 2015 Jun 7 ± 1 days 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 1
Turrialba Costa Rica 2015 Mar 8 2019 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Villarrica Chile 2014 Dec 2 ± 7 days 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 1
Saunders United Kingdom 2014 Nov 12 2019 Oct 28 (continuing) 1
Manam Papua New Guinea 2014 Jun 29 2019 Oct 7 (continuing) 2
Semeru Indonesia 2014 Apr 1 ± 15 days 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 3
Etna Italy 2013 Sep 3 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 2 Yes
Heard Australia 2012 Sep 5 ± 4 days 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 0
Bezymianny Russia 2010 May 21 (?) 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 3
Reventador Ecuador 2008 Jul 27 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 2
Ibu Indonesia 2008 Apr 5 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 1 Yes
Popocatepetl Mexico 2005 Jan 9 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 2 Yes
Suwanosejima Japan 2004 Oct 23 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 2
Nyiragongo DR Congo 2002 May 17 (?) 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 2
Fuego Guatemala 2002 Jan 4 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 3
Bagana Papua New Guinea 2000 Feb 28 (in or before) 2019 Oct 10 (continuing) 2
Sheveluch Russia 1999 Aug 15 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 4 Yes
Erebus Antarctica 1972 Dec 16 (in or before) ± 15 days 2019 Oct 30 (continuing) 2
Erta Ale Ethiopia 1967 Jul 2 (in or before) ± 182 days 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 0
Stromboli Italy 1934 Feb 2 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 2 Yes
Dukono Indonesia 1933 Aug 13 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 3 Yes
Santa Maria Guatemala 1922 Jun 22 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 3
Yasur Vanuatu 1774 Jul 2 (in or before) ± 182 days 2019 Nov 1 (continuing) 3
Report for Stromboli
INGV reported that during 25 November-1 December activity at Stromboli was characterized by ongoing explosive activity mainly from three vents in Area N (north crater area) and at least three vents in Area C-S (south central crater area). Low-to-medium-intensity explosions from Area N occurred at a rate of 7-11 events per hour and ejected lapilli and bombs 80-150 m above the vents. Ejected tephra fell onto the flanks and some blocks rolled a few hundred meters along the Sciara del Fuoco. Medium-intensity explosions from Area C-S occurred at a rate of 4-8 events per hour and ejected coarse material to heights less than150 m above the vents. Material was deposited along the upper parts of the Sciara del Fuoco.
Report for Etna
INGV reported that eruptive activity at Etna’s summit craters continued during 25 November-1 December. Strombolian explosions at Voragine Crater (VOR) occurred at intervals of 5-10 minutes, and many incandescent jets rose above the crater rim. Some explosions created incandescent flashes in emissions rising above the crater rim. A cone which had started forming on the crater floor in mid-September had continued to grow according to observations by field guides. Sporadic ash emissions began at New Southeast Crater (NSEC) on the evening of 30 November, and a single Strombolian explosion was recorded on 1 December. Incandescence from Bocca Nuova Crater was intermittently visible at night.
Report for White Island
On 3 December GeoNet reported that unrest at White Island had continued during the previous week. Explosive gas-and-steam-driven fountaining occurred from the active vent area on the W side of the 1978/90 Crater Complex, near the 2012 lava dome, at the back of the crater lake. Mud and debris were ejected 20-30 m above the vent. The Volcanic Alert Level remained at 2 and the Aviation Color Code remained at Yellow.
Report for Krakatau
PVMBG reported that at 0543 on 27 October an eruptive event at Anak Krakatau ejected a white-and-black plume 150 m above the active vent. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to remain outside of the 2-km-radius hazard zone from the crater.
Report for Sangeang Api
The Darwin VAAC reported that during 27 November-3 December discrete and short-lived ash emissions from Sangeang Api rose to altitudes of 2.4-3.3 km (8,000-11,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW, W, and SW. A thermal anomaly was visible on 27 November. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4).
Report for Karangetang
PVMBG reported that during 25 November-1 December lava continued to effuse from Karangetang’s Main Crater (S), traveling as far as 1.8 km down the Nanitu, Pangi, and Sense drainages on the SW and W flanks. Sometimes dense white plumes rose to 500 m above the summit. Incandescence from both summit craters was visible at night. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4).
Report for Dukono
Based on satellite and wind model data, and information from PVMBG, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 27 November-3 December ash plumes from Dukono rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE, E, and NE. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to remain outside of the 2-km exclusion zone.
Report for Ibu
Based on PVMBG observations and satellite images, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 3 December an ash plume from Ibu rose to 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE. A thermal anomaly was visible in satellite images.
Report for Aira
JMA reported that incandescence from Minamidake Crater (at Aira Caldera’s Sakurajima volcano) was visible at night during 25 November-2 December. There were 16 explosions and three non-explosive eruptive events detected by the seismic network. Ash plumes rose as high as 2.7 km above the crater rim and blocks were ejected as far as 1.3 km away. One of the explosions, recorded at 2010 on 28 November, produced an eruption plume that rose 3.3 km. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a 5-level scale).
Report for Ebeko
Volcanologists in Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island), about 7 km E of Ebeko, observed explosions during 22-23 and 28 November that sent ash plumes up to 2.5 km (8,200 ft) a.s.l. Ash plumes drifted SE and E, and produced ashfall in Severo-Kurilsk on 23 November. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Report for Klyuchevskoy
KVERT reported that Strombolian activity at Klyuchevskoy was visible during 21 and 26-27 November, and a weak thermal anomaly was identified in satellite images during 21-25 and 28 November. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.
Report for Sheveluch
KVERT reported that a thermal anomaly over Sheveluch was identified in satellite images during 22-29 November. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Report for Shishaldin
AVO reported that seismic levels at Shishaldin were variable but elevated during 26 November-3 December. Weather clouds sometimes obscured satellite image views and mostly prevented webcam views, though elevated surface temperatures were still visible in multiple satellite images. An active 1.5-km-long lava flow on the NW flank was visible in satellite images on 1 December. Continuous tremor transitioned to episodic bursts during the morning of 2 December, but by 3 December a decrease in seismic activity and surface temperatures suggested another pause in lava effusion. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch.
Report for Popocatepetl
CENAPRED reported that each day during 26 November-3 December there were 124-187 steam-and-gas emissions from Popocatépetl, some of which contained ash through 1 December. An explosion was recorded at 1036 on 26 November. Another explosion at 0233 on 28 November produced an ash plume that rose 1 km above the crater rim and drifted NW. The event also ejected incandescent material onto the flanks as far away as 1.5 km from the crater. The Alert Level remained at Yellow, Phase Two (middle level on a three-color scale).
Report for Sabancaya
Instituto Geofísico del Perú (IGP) reported that an average of 17 daily low-to-medium intensity explosions occurred at Sabancaya during 25 November-1 December. Gas-and-ash plumes rose as high as 4 km above the summit and drifted NE, E, and S. There were five thermal anomalies identified in satellite data, originating from the 240-m-diameter lava dome in the summit crater. The Alert Level remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale) and the public were warned to stay outside of a 12-km radius.
Report for Nevados de Chillan
SERNAGEOMIN reported that during 26 November-3 December white-to-gray plumes from Nevados de Chillán’s Nicanor Crater rose as high as 1.7 km above the rim and drifted SE, NE, and NNW. Occasional explosions ejecting incandescent material onto the flank were visible at night. The report noted that the newest lava flow (L4) traveled down the NNE flank adjacent to three previous flows (L1, L2, and L3). The point of emission of L4 was about 60 m SSE of the emission point for the previous three lava flows. L4 had two lobes and was about 90 m long, measured from the rim of Nicanor Crater, on 27 November. By 29 November it had lengthened to 165 m. The volcano Alert Level remained at Orange, the second highest level on a four-color scale. ONEMI maintained an Alert Level Yellow (the middle level on a three-color scale) for the communities of Pinto, Coihueco, and San Fabián, and stated that the public should stay at least 3 km away from the crater on the SW flank and 5 km away on the ENE flank.