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Current Eruptions

Although detailed statistics are not kept on daily activity, generally there are around 20 volcanoes actively erupting at any particular time. The Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report (WVAR) for the week ending on 15 October 2019 includes the 14 volcanoes bolded and shown below in the WVAR column (rollover for report).

Overall there are 46 volcanoes with ongoing eruptions as of the Stop Dates indicated, and as reported through the last data update (13 September 2019), sorted with the most recently started eruption at the top. Information about more recently started eruptions can be found in the Weekly Report linked above.

An eruption marked as "continuing" does not always mean that the activity is continuous or happening today, but that there have been at least some intermittent eruptive events at that volcano without a break of at least 3 months since it started. An eruption listed here also might have ended since the last public data update, or at the update time a firm end date had not yet been determined due to potential renewed activity.

Volcano Country Eruption Start Date Eruption Stop Date Max VEI WVAR
Tangkubanparahu Indonesia 2019 Jul 26 2019 Sep 13 (continuing)
Shishaldin United States 2019 Jul 23 2019 Sep 10 (continuing)
Ubinas Peru 2019 Jun 24 2019 Sep 9 (continuing)
Asosan Japan 2019 Apr 16 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) Yes
Sangay Ecuador 2019 Mar 26 2019 Sep 13 (continuing)
Karymsky Russia 2019 Feb 16 2019 Sep 13 (continuing)
Poas Costa Rica 2019 Feb 7 2019 Sep 13 (continuing)
Tinakula Solomon Islands 2018 Dec 8 (in or before) 2019 Sep 10 (continuing) 2
Karangetang Indonesia 2018 Nov 25 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2 Yes
Barren Island India 2018 Sep 25 2019 Sep 9 (continuing) 1
Krakatau Indonesia 2018 Jun 18 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 3 Yes
Merapi Indonesia 2018 May 11 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 3 Yes
Kerinci Indonesia 2018 Apr 21 2019 Sep 2 (continuing) 1
Nyamuragira DR Congo 2018 Apr 18 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 0
Mayon Philippines 2018 Jan 13 2019 Sep 7 (continuing) 2
Kadovar Papua New Guinea 2018 Jan 5 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2
Sangeang Api Indonesia 2017 Jul 15 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2
Ol Doinyo Lengai Tanzania 2017 Apr 9 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 0
Aira Japan 2017 Mar 25 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 1 Yes
Sabancaya Peru 2016 Nov 6 2019 Sep 1 (continuing) 3 Yes
Ebeko Russia 2016 Oct 20 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2 Yes
Saunders United Kingdom 2016 Sep 28 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 1
Nevados de Chillan Chile 2016 Jan 8 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2
Masaya Nicaragua 2015 Oct 3 2019 Sep 12 (continuing) 1
Pacaya Guatemala 2015 Jun 7 ± 1 days 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 1
Turrialba Costa Rica 2015 Mar 8 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2
Villarrica Chile 2014 Dec 2 ± 7 days 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 1
Manam Papua New Guinea 2014 Jun 29 2019 Sep 12 (continuing) 2
Semeru Indonesia 2014 Apr 1 ± 15 days 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 3 Yes
Etna Italy 2013 Sep 3 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2
Heard Australia 2012 Sep 5 ± 4 days 2019 Aug 7 (continuing) 0
Bezymianny Russia 2010 May 21 (?) 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 3
Reventador Ecuador 2008 Jul 27 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2 Yes
Ibu Indonesia 2008 Apr 5 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 1 Yes
Popocatepetl Mexico 2005 Jan 9 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2
Suwanosejima Japan 2004 Oct 23 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2
Nyiragongo DR Congo 2002 May 17 (?) 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2
Fuego Guatemala 2002 Jan 4 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 3
Bagana Papua New Guinea 2000 Feb 28 (in or before) 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2
Sheveluch Russia 1999 Aug 15 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 4 Yes
Erebus Antarctica 1972 Dec 16 (in or before) ± 15 days 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2
Erta Ale Ethiopia 1967 Jul 2 (in or before) ± 182 days 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 0
Stromboli Italy 1934 Feb 2 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 2
Dukono Indonesia 1933 Aug 13 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 3 Yes
Santa Maria Guatemala 1922 Jun 22 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 3
Yasur Vanuatu 1774 Jul 2 (in or before) ± 182 days 2019 Sep 13 (continuing) 3
Report for Metis Shoal
According to news articles the Tonga Geological Services Office of the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources stated that several observations indicating a possible eruption at Metis Shoal, also known as Lateiki, were reported during 13-15 October. Real Tonga pilots flying between Tongatapu and Vava'u observed the intermittent plumes rising to 4.6-5.2 km (15,000-17,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifting N on 15 October. Ash in the plumes was not identifiable according to the Wellington VAAC.
Report for Ambrym
Vanuatu Meteorology and Geo-Hazards Department (VMGD) reported that data and observations during February-October indicated that conditions at Ambrym had become stable after the eruption in December 2018 that focused on the summit caldera and East Rift Zone. On 10 October the Alert Level was lowered to 1 (on a scale of 0-5) indicating minor unrest. VMGD warned the public to stay outside of the Permanent Danger Zone defined as a 1-km radius from Benbow Crater and a 2-km radius from Marum Crater, and additionally to stay away from the ground cracks resulting from the December 2019 eruption (a 500-m-radius around the major cracks at Paamal village).
Report for Krakatau
PVMBG reported that at 1010 and 1226 on 12 October, 1026 on 13 October, and 1228 on 14 October the webcam at Anak Krakatau recorded dense gray-black ash plumes rising about 200 m above the bottom of the crater and drifting N. The 14 October event was recorded by the seismic network for three minutes. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to remain outside of the 2-km-radius hazard zone from the crater.
Report for Merapi
PVMBG reported that the lava dome at Merapi slowly grew during 3-10 October and was an estimated 468,000 cubic meters, based on 19 September drone photos. At 1631 on 14 October an eruptive event was recorded by the seismic network for four minutes and 30 seconds. A plume rose 3 km above the summit and drifted SW, causing ashfall 30 minutes after the eruption until 1900 in areas as far as 25 km W. A pyroclastic flow traveled down the SW flank. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and residents were warned to stay outside of the 3-km exclusion zone.
Report for Semeru
The Darwin VAAC reported that during 13-14 September ash plumes from Semeru rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW based on satellite images and weather models. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4).
Report for Karangetang
PVMBG reported that during 7-15 October lava continued to effuse from Karangetang’s Main Crater (S), traveling as far as 1.5 km down the Nanitu, Pangi, and Sense drainages on the SW and W flanks. Sometimes dense white plumes rose to 400 m above the summit. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4).
Report for Dukono
Based on satellite and wind model data, and information from PVMBG, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 9-15 October ash plumes from Dukono rose to altitudes of 1.8-2.1 km (6,000-7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted in multiple directions. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to remain outside of the 2-km exclusion zone.
Report for Ibu
PVMBG reported that at 0707 on 15 October an ash plume from Ibu rose at least 400 m above the summit and drifted S. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to stay at least 2 km away from the active crater, and 3.5 km away on the N side.
Report for Aira
JMA reported that incandescence from Minamidake crater (at Aira Caldera’s Sakurajima volcano) was occasionally visible at night during 7-15 October. There were 13 explosions detected by the seismic network and nine non-explosive eruptive events. Eruption plumes rose 2.3-2.7 km above the crater rim and large blocks were ejected as far as 1.7 km away. The sulfur dioxide emission rate was high, at 2,100 tons/day, on 11 October. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a 5-level scale).
Report for Asosan
JMA reported that during 7-15 October ash plumes rose as high as 1.3 km above Asosan’s summit crater rim, causing ashfall in areas downwind including periodically at the Kumamoto Regional Meteorological Observatory. Crater incandescence was occasionally visible at night. The sulfur dioxide emission rate was very high at 4,000 tons per day on 11 October. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-5).
Report for Ebeko
KVERT reported that ash from Ebeko was reported in Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island), about 7 km E, during 4-5 October. Volcanologists in Severo-Kurilsk observed explosions during 7-8 and 10 October that sent ash plumes up to 2.5 km (8,200 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and NE. A weak thermal anomaly was identified in satellite images on 8 October. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Report for Sheveluch
KVERT reported that a thermal anomaly over Sheveluch was identified in satellite images during 4-11 October. Explosions seen in video and satellite images on 6 and 9 October produced ash plumes that rose 6.5-11 km (21,300-36,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 1,100 km E. Resuspended ash drifted 170 km E on 4 and 8 October. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Report for Reventador
IG reported that during 8-15 October seismic data from Reventador’s network indicated a high level of seismic activity, including explosions, long-period earthquakes, harmonic tremor, and signals indicating emissions. Weather often prevented views of the summit area, although during clear conditions ash-and-steam plumes were visible rising sometimes higher than 1 km above the crater rim and drifting NW, W, and SW. Crater incandescence was periodically observed at night. Blocks were observed rolling down the flanks on 10 and 14 October.
Report for Sabancaya
Instituto Geofísico del Perú (IGP) reported that an average of 36 low-to-medium intensity explosions per day occurred at Sabancaya during 7-13 October. Gas-and-ash plumes rose as high as 3.5 km above the summit and drifted SE and SW. There were 15 thermal anomalies identified in satellite data. The Alert Level remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale) and the public were warned to stay outside of a 12-km radius.