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Report on Klyuchevskoy (Russia) — February 1987

Scientific Event Alert Network Bulletin, vol. 12, no. 2 (February 1987)
Managing Editor: Lindsay McClelland.

Klyuchevskoy (Russia) Strong explosions; lava from flank fissure

Please cite this report as:

Global Volcanism Program, 1987. Report on Klyuchevskoy (Russia). In: McClelland, L (ed.), Scientific Event Alert Network Bulletin, 12:2. Smithsonian Institution. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.GVP.SEAN198702-300260.

Volcano Profile |  Complete Bulletin


Klyuchevskoy

Russia

56.056°N, 160.642°E; summit elev. 4754 m

All times are local (unless otherwise noted)


Soviet geologists reported that after intense summit crater explosive activity a NE-trending fracture (azimuth 135°) opened 24 February [but see 13:4] on the SE flank at 3,900-3,400 m altitude. Small amounts of lava were quietly emitted along the fracture. The flank eruption ceased on 26 February.

Small plumes had been intermittently visible on satellite images (figure 1) since 18 January. More vigorous activity was evident beginning 17 February and was almost continuous through 24 February (table 2). Maximum plume length was 500 km and maximum altitude may have reached 13.7 km.

Figure (see Caption) Figure 1. NOAA 10 thermal infrared (3.8 µm) satellite image on 18 February at 1017. A plume extends 65 km from Kliuchevskoi at ~3 km altitude. Courtesy of NOAA/NESDIS.

Table 2.Descriptions of Kliuchevskoi plumes from infrared weather satellite images, 21-28 February 1987. Plume altitudes were estimated by comparing wind data from radiosondes launched 15 km N of the volcano with directions of plume movement.

[Skip text table]
     Date       Time      Altitude      Length      Direction      Satellite
     21 Feb 87  1022      1.5-7.2       65          ESE            NOAA 10
                1200      1.5-7.2       375         ESE            GMS
                1500      1.5-7.2       250         ESE            GMS
                1800      9.2-10.4      125         E              GMS
                2100      1.5-3.0       150         E              GMS
     22 Feb 87  0000      1.5-3.0       440         E              GMS
                0600      3.0           125         E              GMS
                0900      5.6-11.8      250         ENE            GMS
                1031      9.2-13.7      105         ENE            NOAA 10
                1200      9.2-13.7      440         ENE            GMS
                1500      9.2-13.7      500         ENE            GMS
                1800      5.6-10.4      500         ENE            GMS
                2100      5.6-10.4      500         ENE            GMS
     23 Feb 87  0000      10.4-11.8     310         ENE            GMS
                0300      ---           cloudy      ---            GMS
     24 Feb 87  0600      ---           cloudy      ---            GMS
                0900      5.6           190         NW             GMS
                1448      5.6           125         NW             NOAA 9
                1500      5.6           500         NW             GMS
                1800      3.0           500         NW             GMS
                2100      3.0           500         NW             GMS
     25 Feb 87  0000      ---             no activity              GMS
     28 Feb 87  0442      ---           20          WSW            NOAA 9

Geologic Background. Klyuchevskoy (also spelled Kliuchevskoi) is Kamchatka's highest and most active volcano. Since its origin about 6000 years ago, the beautifully symmetrical, 4835-m-high basaltic stratovolcano has produced frequent moderate-volume explosive and effusive eruptions without major periods of inactivity. It rises above a saddle NE of sharp-peaked Kamen volcano and lies SE of the broad Ushkovsky massif. More than 100 flank eruptions have occurred during the past roughly 3000 years, with most lateral craters and cones occurring along radial fissures between the unconfined NE-to-SE flanks of the conical volcano between 500 m and 3600 m elevation. The morphology of the 700-m-wide summit crater has been frequently modified by historical eruptions, which have been recorded since the late-17th century. Historical eruptions have originated primarily from the summit crater, but have also included numerous major explosive and effusive eruptions from flank craters.

Information Contacts: A. Khrenov, IV; M. Matson and W. Gould, NOAA/NESDIS.