Fentale

Photo of this volcano
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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 8.975°N
  • 39.93°E

  • 2007 m
    6583 ft

  • 221190
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Fentale.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Fentale.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Fentale.

Fentale, also known as Fantale, is a large stratovolcano at the northern end of the Main Ethiopian Rift. It consists primarily of rhyolitic obsidian lava flows with minor tuffs. Welded pantelleritic ash flows accompanied formation of a 2.5 x 4.5 km summit caldera, which has steep-sided walls up to 500 m high. The WNW-ESE-trending elliptical caldera has an orientation perpendicular to the Ethiopian Rift, and post-caldera vents occur along the same orientation. Trachytic and obsidian lava flows occur on the caldera floor, and fresh-looking lava flows descend the flanks from satellitic vents. An eruption from Fentale during the 13th century destroyed an Abyssinian town and church south of the volcano. In 1820 basaltic lava flows were extruded onto the Main Ethiopian Rift from a 4-km-long fissure on the south flank, and lava flows were erupted on the floor of the caldera.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1820 (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations Caldera floor and SW flank
1250 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.



Synonyms
Fantale | Fantalle | Fantali


Cones
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Sabober Tuff ring
The lava flow at the left was erupted on the caldera floor of Fentale volcano in 1820. This view looks from the east. The walls of the 3 x 4 km summit caldera of Fentale are up to 500-m high. During the 1820 eruption, basaltic lava flows were also extruded onto the Main Ethiopian Rift from a 4-km-long fissure on the south flank.

Photo by Giday Wolde-Gabriel, 1984 (Los Alamos National Laboratory).
A vertical aerial photo of the Quaternary Fentale volcanic complex, lying along the main Ethiopian rift zone, shows its prominent summit caldera and lava flows forming its flanks. The 3 x 4 km caldera with steep-sided walls up to 500 m high is elongated perpendicular to the direction of the regional fissures of the Ethiopian Rift. Note the recent rhyolitic obsidian lava flow to the NE (upper right) marked with curved flow ridges. The dark lava flow on the caldera floor was erupted in 1820.

Photo by Imperial Highway Authority of Ethiopia (published in Green and Short, 1971).
The caldera of Fentale volcano, also known as Fantale, is seen in a fish-eye lens view from the NE caldera rim. Welded pantelleritic ash flows accompanied formation of a 2.5 x 4.5 km summit caldera, which has steep-sided walls up to 500 m high. The WNW-ESE-trending elliptical caldera has an orientation perpendicular to the Ethiopian Rift, and post-caldera vents occur along the same orientation. Trachytic and obsidian lava flows occur on the caldera floor, and lava flows were erupted on the floor of the caldera and on its flanks in 1820.

Photo by Tom Pfeiffer, 2008 (www.volcanodiscovery.com)
Fentale, also known as Fantale, is a large stratovolcano seen here in profile from the arid floor of the Ethiopian Rift. Fentale lies at the northern end of the Main Ethiopian Rift and consists primarily of rhyolitic obsidian lava flows with minor tuffs. Welded pantelleritic ash flows accompanied formation of a 2.5 x 4.5 km summit caldera, which has steep-sided walls up to 500 m high. The WNW-ESE-trending elliptical caldera has an orientation perpendicular to the Ethiopian Rift, and post-caldera vents occur along the same orientation.

Photo by Tom Pfeiffer, 2008 (www.volcanodiscovery.com)

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Acocella V, Korme T, Salvini F, Funiciello R, 2003. Elliptic calderas in the Ethiopian Rift: control of pre-existing structures. J Volc Geotherm Res, 119: 189-203.

Gibson I L, 1967. Preliminary account of the volcanic geology of Fantale, Shoa, Ethiopia. Bull Geophys Observ Addis Ababa, 10: 59-68.

Green J, Short N M, 1971. Volcanic Landforms and Surface Features: a Photographic Atlas and Glossary. New York: Springer-Verlag, 519 p.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Newhall C G, Dzurisin D, 1988. Historical unrest at large calderas of the world. U S Geol Surv Bull, 1855: 1108 p, 2 vol.

Richard J J, Neumann van Padang M, 1957. Africa and the Red Sea. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI 4: 1-118.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano
Caldera
Fissure vent(s)
Tuff ring

Tectonic Setting

Rift zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Rhyolite
Trachyte / Trachyandesite
Trachybasalt / Tephrite Basanite
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
1,919
14,201
169,357
3,482,286

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Fentale Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.