St. Andrew Strait

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 2.38°S
  • 147.35°E

  • 270 m
    886 ft

  • 250010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for St. Andrew Strait.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for St. Andrew Strait.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for St. Andrew Strait.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1953 Jun 27 1957 Jan 28 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Tuluman
1883 Mar 28 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Tuluman
0350 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Lou Island (Bedal volcano)
0240 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Lou Island (Bedal volcano)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


The St. Andrew Strait volcano is located in the Admiralty Islands north of Papua New Guinea. The volcanic complex consists of a series of overlapping Quaternary cones formed by rhyolitic lava flows and pyroclastic deposits on Lou and Tuluman Islands. Volcanism is aligned along a curved arc, extending through the 12-km-long Lou Island, which may represent an incipient caldera ring fracture. Tuluman Island, seen here from the SW with Lou Island 1.5 km away at the upper left, was formed during a 1953-1957 eruption.

Photo by Wally Johnson, 1964 (Australia Bureau of Mineral Resources).
See title for photo information.
Intermittent submarine explosive and effusive eruptions from multiple vents during June 1953 to January 1957 created new islands that coalesced to form present-day Tuluman Island. Activity was most vigorous Feburary-March 1955 and near the end of the eruption in January 1957, when subaerial effusive activity dominated. This March 1960 view from the SW shows dark-colored rhyolitic lava flows at the far end of the island and lighter-colored deposits from eroded pyroclastic cones.

Photo courtesy of Wally Johnson, 1960 (Australia Bureau of Mineral Resources).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for St. Andrew Strait in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

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