Garbuna Group

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  • Papua New Guinea
  • New Britain
  • Stratovolcano(es)
  • 2008 CE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 5.45°S
  • 150.03°E

  • 564 m
    1850 ft

  • 252070
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

8 October-14 October 2008

RVO reported that white plumes from Garbuna were emitted during 6-10 October. Deep booming noises were occasionally heard. On 7 October an explosion produced forceful emissions of dense white vapor.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)



 Available Weekly Reports


2008: March | July | September | October
2006: January
2005: October | November


8 October-14 October 2008

RVO reported that white plumes from Garbuna were emitted during 6-10 October. Deep booming noises were occasionally heard. On 7 October an explosion produced forceful emissions of dense white vapor.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


1 October-7 October 2008

RVO reported that forceful emissions of dense white plumes from Garbuna were accompanied by intermittent ash emissions during 1-4 October to an altitude of 1.6 km (5,200 ft) a.s.l. Occasional weak roaring and rumbling noises were reported in Garu village, about 9 km NW. An overflight on 3 October revealed that existing vents at the summit had increased in size and new vents and fumaroles appeared in the E sector of the lava dome. The main vent that had been restricted to the outside flank of the cone had enlarged considerably (more than tripled in size) and merged with the November 2005 vent. The original vent that opened on 17 October 2005 was larger and vigorously fuming. Although there was little evidence of juvenile material having been ejected and there was surprisingly little eruptive material around the summit, it and areas more than 1 km away from the active vents were cratered, possibly from lithic bombs. Fumarolic activity in the summit region away from the currently active vents had ceased.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


24 September-30 September 2008

RVO reported that ash emissions from Garbuna started on 23 September and continued through 1 October. Ash plumes rose to an approximate altitude of 1.6 km (5,200 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


9 July-15 July 2008

Moderate to strong emissions of pale white to light gray ash clouds were observed from Garbuna on the morning of 13 July 2008. Summit activity was low between 1 and 12 July, when emissions consisted mainly of white vapor. The ash emissions on 13 July formed a column that rose about 1 km above the summit area. Seismic activity was generally very low during the corresponding period.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


19 March-25 March 2008

RVO reported that white plumes from two sources at the summit of Garbuna drifted SE during 19-21 March. Ashfall and a strong sulfur odor were reported in Kimbe Town (about 17 km SE) on 19 March.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


12 March-18 March 2008

RVO reported that renewed eruptive activity from Garbuna started on 11 March and consisted of ash emissions accompanied by occasional booming noises. The resultant ash plumes rose to an altitude less that 1.6 km (5,200 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW. Fine ashfall was reported in areas downwind. Ash emissions continued during 12-13 March. During 14-15 March, steam-and-ash plumes again rose to an altitude less that 1.6 km (5,200 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW. Ashfall and a sulfur odor was reported from areas downwind. Occasional booming noises were heard. On 16 March, steam plumes rose to an altitude of 1.6 km (5,200 ft) a.s.l. Observers from KVO (15 km SE) reported that multiple steam plumes rose from numerous vents at the summit. Steam plumes were again noted on 17 and 18 March and a strong sulfur odor was noticed on 18 March.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


25 January-31 January 2006

During 1-15 January, the two vents at the summit of Garbuna emitted small-to-moderate volumes of gas. There were no other unusual observations. Seismicity was low and dominated by occasional low-frequency earthquakes.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO) via the Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center


23 November-29 November 2005

During 21-27 November, two vents at the summit of Garbuna continued to release weak-to-moderate volumes of steam that rose a few hundred meters above the summit and drifted in various directions. No incandescence was seen at the volcano and no noises were heard. Seismicity was at very low levels.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO) via the Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center


26 October-1 November 2005

Based on information from RVO and satellite imagery, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 25 October a pale gray ash cloud rose a few hundred meters above the summit of Garbuna, but no eruption was noted.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


19 October-25 October 2005

RVO reported that visually Garbuna remained unchanged on 22 October from it's condition during the previous days, with moderate-to-thick "white fume" billowing from two vents. A banging noise from the summit region was heard on the evening of 21 October in the nearby towns of Walindi and Kimbe. The scent of sulfur was noted in Sisi village. Seismicity increased slightly, but remained at low levels. Small high-frequency events were common. Based on information from RVO, the Darwin VAAC reported that a minor ash cloud emitted from the volcano on 24 October rose a few hundred meters above the summit

Sources: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO), Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


12 October-18 October 2005

RVO reported that an eruption began at Garbuna on the afternoon of 16 October when "white vapor" rose above the volcano and a couple of felt earthquakes occurred. On 17 October, an eruption column rose 3-4 km above the volcano's summit (or 11,700-15,000 ft a.s.l.). At 1100 fine ash fell on the W and NW sides of the volcano, covering two plantations. Water sources originating from Garbuna were affected by the eruption. According to RVO, the volcano last erupted about 1,700 years ago.

Sources: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO), Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC), The National


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2008 Jul 13 2008 Oct 4 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2008 Mar 11 2008 Mar 13 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2005 Oct 16 2005 Nov 17 (in or after) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Central part of Garbuna complex
0150 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Garbuna and Welcker

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Cooke R J S, Johnson R W, 1978. Volcanoes and volcanology in Papua New Guinea. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Rpt, 78/2: 1-46.

Fisher N H, 1957. Melanesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 5: 1-105.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Johnson R W, Blake D H, 1972. The Cape Hoskins area, southern Willaumez Peninsula, the Witu Islands, and associated volcanic centres, New Britain: volcanic geology and petrology. Aust Bur Min Resour Geol Geophys Rec, 1972/133: 1-102.

The basaltic-to-dacitic Garbuna volcano group consists of three volcanic peaks, Krummel, Garbuna, and Welcker. They are located along a 7-km N-S line above a shield-like foundation at the southern end of the Willaumez Peninsula. The central and lower peaks of the centrally located 564-m-high Garbuna volcano contain a large vegetation-free area that is probably the most extensive thermal field in Papua New Guinea. A prominent lava dome and blocky lava flow in the center of thermal area have resisted destruction by thermal activity, and may be of Holocene age. The 854-m-high Krummel volcano at the south end of the group contains a summit crater, breached to the NW. The highest peak of the Garbuna group is 1005-m-high Welcker volcano, which has fed blocky lava flows that extend to the eastern coast of the peninsula. The last major eruption from both it and Garbuna volcanoes took place about 1800 years ago. The first historical eruption of the complex took place at Garbuna in October 2005.