Lamington

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 8.95°S
  • 148.15°E

  • 1680 m
    5510 ft

  • 253010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

24 April-30 April 2002

Scientists from the Rabaul Volcano Observatory carried out a 4-day investigation at Lamington and concluded that there was no new volcanic activity. For the previous 3-4 weeks rumors had been circulating that Lamington was active, with reports of "fire" and "smoke" emanating from the volcano, felt earthquakes, and volcanic noises.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO) via the Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center



 Available Weekly Reports


2002: April


24 April-30 April 2002

Scientists from the Rabaul Volcano Observatory carried out a 4-day investigation at Lamington and concluded that there was no new volcanic activity. For the previous 3-4 weeks rumors had been circulating that Lamington was active, with reports of "fire" and "smoke" emanating from the volcano, felt earthquakes, and volcanic noises.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO) via the Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center


17 April-23 April 2002

The Darwin VAAC stated on 24 April that reports of an eruption at Lamington on 22 April were false. Based on information from Geoscience Australia and satellite imagery, the Darwin VAAC originally reported that an E-drifting ash cloud from Lamington seemed to be evident on satellite imagery on 22 April at 1741. Thunderstorms near the volcano made it difficult to locate possible ash on satellite imagery. On 23 April at 1135 a flight service reported that no volcanic activity was observed at Lamington. A team from the Rabaul Volcano Observatory is investigating rumors of activity at the volcano.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1951 Jan 17 1956 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
4850 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Dea Ash
5980 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Owalama Ash

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Arculus R J, Johnson R W, Chappell B W, McKee C D, Sakai H, 1983. Ophiolite-contaminated andesites, trachybasalts, and cognate inclusions of Mount Lamington, Papua New Guinea: anhydrite-amphibole-bearing lavas and the 1951 cumulodome. J Volc Geotherm Res, 18: 215-247.

Cooke R J S, Johnson R W, 1978. Volcanoes and volcanology in Papua New Guinea. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Rpt, 78/2: 1-46.

Fisher N H, 1957. Melanesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 5: 1-105.

Mori J, McKee C, Talai B, Itikarai I, 1989. A summary of precursors to volcanic eruptions in Papua New Guinea. In: Latter J H (ed), {Volcanic Hazards - Assessment and Monitoring}, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, p 260-291.

Ruxton B P, 1966b. Correlation and stratigraphy of dacitic ash-fall layers in northeastern Papua. J Geol Soc Aust, 13: 41-67.

Taylor G A, 1958a. The 1951 eruption of Mount Lamington, Papua. Aust Bur Min Resour Geol Geophys Bull, 38: 1-117.

Lamington is an andesitic stratovolcano with a 1.3-km-wide breached summit crater containing a lava dome. Prior to its renowned devastating eruption in 1951, the forested peak had not been recognized as a volcano. Mount Lamington rises to 1680 m above the coastal plain north of the Owen Stanley Range. A summit complex of lava domes and crater remnants rises above a low-angle base of volcaniclastic deposits that are dissected by radial valleys. A prominent broad "avalanche valley" extends northward from the breached crater. Ash layers from two early Holocene eruptions at Lamington have been identified. After a long quiescent period, the volcano sprang suddenly to life in 1951, producing a powerful explosive eruption during which devastating pyroclastic flows and surges swept all sides of the volcano, killing nearly 3000 persons. The eruption concluded with growth of a 560-m-high lava dome in the summit crater.