Ambang

Photo of this volcano
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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 0.75°N
  • 124.42°E

  • 1795 m
    5888 ft

  • 266020
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

6 August-12 August 2014

PVMBG noted that due to decreased volcanic seismicity and activity the Alert Level for Ambang was lowered to 1 (on a scale of 1-4) on 8 August. Residents and visitors were advised to not approach the crater.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)

Index of Weekly Reports


2014: July | August

Weekly Reports


6 August-12 August 2014

PVMBG noted that due to decreased volcanic seismicity and activity the Alert Level for Ambang was lowered to 1 (on a scale of 1-4) on 8 August. Residents and visitors were advised to not approach the crater.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


9 July-15 July 2014

On 3 July, CVGHM reported a significant increase in seismicity from Ambang, particularly shallow earthquakes (VB). During 1 June-2 July, 7-9 shallow volcanic (VB) and 2-9 deep volcanic (VA) earthquakes were detected per week, for totals of 33 VB and 29 VA earthquakes in that time. The Alert Level was raised to Level 2 on 3 July. An exclusion zone was placed around the crater with a radius of 1.5 km. Persistent diffuse gas emissions were observed reaching 10-25 m above the crater.

CVGHM noted that previous eruptions from Ambang were dominated by effusive lava flows and were punctuated by explosive eruptions producing pyroclastic flows and fallout. Ambang has an eruption frequency of once every 39-127 years; the last event recorded was a phreatic explosion in 2005. A persistent fumarolic field remains from that activity. CVGHM noted that a magmatic eruption generating pyroclastic flows would threaten communities SE of the summit including the villages of Bongkudai, Goaan, Purworejo, and Modayong.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Ambang.

The compound Ambang volcano is the westernmost of the active volcanoes on the northern arm of Sulawesi. The 1795-m-high stratovolcano rises 750 m above lake Danau. Several craters up to 400 m in diameter and five solfatara fields are located at the summit. Ambang's only known historical eruption, of unspecified character, took place in the 1840s.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1845 ± 5 years Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.



Cones
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Binangunan, Mount Stratovolcano 1795 m
The compound volcano Ambang, seen here from Purworejo village, is the westernmost of the active volcanoes on the northern arm of Sulawesi Island. Five fumarole fields are located near the summit. An eruption in the 1840's is the only one known from Ambang volcano.

Photo by Ruska Hadian, 1973 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
This fumarole, located on the SE side of the summit, is the largest in the five solfatara fields at the summit of Ambang volcano.

Photo by Ruska Hadian, 1973 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
Ambang volcano, towering above farmlands below its western flank, is a large stratovolcano at the western end of a volcanic chain stretching across the northern arm of the island of Sulawesi. The only recorded historical eruption took place during the 1840's. Five solfatara fields occur at the summit of Gunung Ambang.

Anonymous photo, 1996.

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Kusumadinata K, 1979. Data Dasar Gunungapi Indonesia. Bandung: Volc Surv Indonesia, 820 p.

Neumann van Padang M, 1951. Indonesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 1: 1-271.

Volcano Types

Complex

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
9,155
46,469
319,137
1,730,602

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Ambang Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.