Camiguin

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 9.203°N
  • 124.673°E

  • 1552 m
    5091 ft

  • 271080
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Camiguin.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Camiguin.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Camiguin.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1948 Sep 1 1953 Jul Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Upper NE flank of Hibok-Hibok
[ 1902 Jul 27 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1897 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
1871 Apr 30 1875 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Lower NW flank of Hibok-Hibok (Mt. Vulcan)
1862 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Hibok-Hibok
1827 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Hibok-Hibok

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Camiguin Island, just off the coast of north-central Mindanao Island (lower right), consists of four overlapping stratovolcanoes. Cloud-covered Mt. Mambajao forms the high point of Camiguin Island at 1552 m. The youngest volcano, Hibok-Hibok (also known as Catarman), has been active during historical time and lies at the NW end of the island. Major eruptions during 1871-75 and 1948-53 formed flank lava domes at Hibok-Hibok and produced pyroclastic flows that devastated coastal villages.

NASA Landsat image, 2002 (courtesy of Hawaii Synergy Project, Univ. of Hawaii Institute of Geophysics & Planetology).
See title for photo information.
Mt. Vulcan (left) and Hibok-Hibok (right) are two historically active lava domes on Camiguin Island. These two domes were active in the 19th and 20th centuries, with Mt. Vulcan forming in 1871. Several historical eruptions have occurred at Hibok-Hibok, the most recent from 1948 to 1953, when pyroclastic flows devastated island villages. The 20-km-long Camiguin Island lies just off the coast of north-central Mindanao Island and consists of four overlapping stratovolcanoes and flank lava domes.

Photo by Juny La Putt, 2002.
See title for photo information.
Mt. Vulcan, a lava dome on the NW flank of the Hibok-Hibok lava-dome complex, was formed during an eruption from 1871 to 1875. Following earthquakes beginning in January 1871, an explosion occurred on April 30 from a vent on the northwest flank near the coast, destroying an area of 3 km radius. Explosive activity continued for about a week, after which lava effusion began. Dome growth lasted for four years, producing by 1875 a dome about 1.6 km in diameter.

Photo by Juny La Putt, 2002.
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Camiguin in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites