Tatun Group

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 25.17°N
  • 121.52°E

  • 1120 m
    3674 ft

  • 281032
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Tatun Group.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Tatun Group.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Tatun Group.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0648 (after) ± 11 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Uranium-series Shamao
4095 BCE ± 35 years Unknown Confirmed 1 Radiocarbon (corrected) Cisingshan

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


The Tatun (Datun) volcano group forms the northernmost part of Taiwan, north of the capital city of Taipei (lower left). About 20 andesitic lava domes are included in the Tatun group. The two small narrow peninsulas west of the top center of this NASA Landsat image mosaic (with north to the top) are formed by lava flows from the Tatun group. The latest eruptions in the group are of late Pleistocene and mid-Holocene age, but hot springs, fumaroles, and solfataras are found over wide areas, and extensive geothermal exploration has occurred.

NASA Landsat7 image (worldwind.arc.nasa.gov)
See title for photo information.
Lava domes of the Tatun (Datun) volcano group rises to the NE beyond Taipei, the capital city of Taiwan. About 20 andesitic lava domes are included in the Tatun group. The latest eruptions in the group are of late Pleistocene and mid-Holocene age. Hot springs, fumaroles, and solfataras are found over wide areas, and extensive geothermal exploration has occurred.

Photo by Alexander Belousov, 2008 (Institute of Volcanology, Kliuchi).
See title for photo information.
A phreatic eruption from a fissure on the west side of Cisingshan lava dome, seen from the west, took place at the time of the Cisingshan debris avalanche about 6000 years ago. The fissures contain small funnel-shaped craters that were the sources of explosive breccias several hundred meters wide and several meters thick that were considered to possibly be related to lithostatic unloading of the youngest lava flows of Cisingshan, which may have occurred only a few years before the collapse.

Photo by Alexander Belousov, 2008 (Institute of Volcanology, Kliuchi).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


The following 6 samples associated with this volcano can be found in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections. Catalog number links will open a window with more information.

Catalog Number Sample Description
NMNH 117182-1 Altered andesite
NMNH 117182-2 Hornblende dacite
NMNH 117182-3 Plagioclase andesite
NMNH 117182-4 Plagioclase andesite with hornblende and pyroxene
NMNH 117182-5 Olivine andesite
NMNH 117182-6 Olivine andesite

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