Yakedake

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 36.227°N
  • 137.587°E

  • 2455 m
    8052 ft

  • 283070
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Bulletin Report: February 1995 (BGVN 20:02)


Hydrothermal explosion kills four people

A hydrothermal explosion around 1430 on 11 February killed four people at a highway construction site, located in a geothermal area along the narrow Azusa-gawa River ~2 km SE of the summit. The Geological Survey of Japan reported that there were at least two explosions from the vent (12 m long and 6 m wide). The first, a large explosion, created a 1,500-m-high plume composed of mud and gas, and caused collapse of the river bank, burying the primary vent. A second explosion scattered mud and gas within 200 m of the vent. JMA staff who surveyed the site on 12 February and 13 March noted that fume rising to a height of 20 m was almost at the boiling point. No explosions have been reported since 12 February.

Information Contacts: JMA.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Yakedake.

Index of Bulletin Reports


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

02/1995 (BGVN 20:02) Hydrothermal explosion kills four people




Bulletin Reports

All information contained in these reports is preliminary and subject to change.


02/1995 (BGVN 20:02) Hydrothermal explosion kills four people

A hydrothermal explosion around 1430 on 11 February killed four people at a highway construction site, located in a geothermal area along the narrow Azusa-gawa River ~2 km SE of the summit. The Geological Survey of Japan reported that there were at least two explosions from the vent (12 m long and 6 m wide). The first, a large explosion, created a 1,500-m-high plume composed of mud and gas, and caused collapse of the river bank, burying the primary vent. A second explosion scattered mud and gas within 200 m of the vent. JMA staff who surveyed the site on 12 February and 13 March noted that fume rising to a height of 20 m was almost at the boiling point. No explosions have been reported since 12 February.

Information Contacts: JMA.
Download or Cite this Report

Yakedake rises above the popular resort of Kamikochi in the Northern Japan Alps. The small dominantly andesitic stratovolcano, one of several Japanese volcanoes named Yakedake or Yakeyama ("Burning Peak" or "Burning Mountain"), was constructed astride a N-S-trending ridge between the older volcanoes of Warudaniyama and Shirataniyama. Akandanayama, about 4 km SSW, is a stratovolcano with lava domes that was active into the Holocene. A 300-m-wide crater is located at the summit, and explosion craters are found on the SE and N flanks. Frequent small-to-moderate phreatic eruptions have occurred during the 20th century. On 11 February 1995 a hydrothermal explosion in a geothermal area killed two persons at a highway construction site.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1995 Feb 11 1995 Feb 11 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations SE flank (Azusa-gawa)
1962 Jun 17 1963 Jun 29 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations North flank (Kurodani and Nakao-toge)
1939 Jun 4 1939 Jun 4 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1935 Sep 11 1935 Nov 12 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1932 Feb 6 1932 Feb 6 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1931 Mar 26 1931 Jun 24 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1930 Mar 13 1930 May 11 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Inkyo-ko
1929 Apr 17 1929 Apr 19 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit (Inkyo-ko), NW flank (Kurodani)
1927 Dec 15 1927 Dec 15 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit (Inkyo-ko), NW flank (Kurodani)
1927 Jan 23 1927 Apr 29 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit (Inkyo-ko), NW flank (Kurodani)
1924 Nov 16 1926 Jan 27 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit (Inkyo-ko), NW flank (Kurodani)
1923 Jun 26 1923 Aug 2 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NW flank (Kurodani Crater), Inkyo-ko
1922 Mar 10 1922 Mar 19 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations NW flank (Kurodani Crater), Inkyo-ko
1921 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations
1920 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations
1919 Nov 1 1919 Nov 1 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NW flank (Kurodani Crater)
1918 Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Taisho crater
1917 Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Taisho Crater
1916 Mar 17 1916 Apr 12 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Taisho Crater, Inkyo-ko
1915 Jun 6 1915 Jul 16 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations 1911 summit crater, SE flank (Taisho)
1915 Feb 1915 Feb Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1913 Sep 1 (?) 1914 Jan 13 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Inkyo-ko
1912 Feb 11 1912 Sep (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1911 May 6 1911 Aug 23 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations New summit crater (Inkyo-ko)
1910 Nov 11 1910 Nov 30 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit crater (Shoga-ike)
1907 Dec 8 1909 Jun 1 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit crater (Shoga-ike)
1746 Apr 18 1746 Apr 19 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Ykd-Tu7 tephra
1585 Dec (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Ykd-Tu6 tephra
1460 (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology Ykd-Tu5 tephra
1440 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Ykd-Tu4 tephra
1270 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Ykd-Tu3 tephra
0686 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Ykd-Tu2 tephra
0630 (?) Unknown Confirmed 1 Tephrochronology Ykd-Tu1 tephra
0350 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (corrected)
0400 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Ykd-Tl2 tephra
0850 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Ykd-Tl1 tephra
2550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Tephrochronology
7450 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Tephrochronology Akandana-yama

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Synonyms

Iwo-dake | Yake-dake

Cones

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Shiratani-yama
    Siratani-yama
Stratovolcano 2140 m
Warudani-yama Stratovolcano 2224 m

Craters

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Junga-ike Crater
Kamibori Crater
Kurodani Crater
Nakao-toge Crater
Shimobori Crater
Shiramizu Crater
Taisho Crater
Yake-dake, whose name means "Burning Mountain," rises above the popular resort of Kamikochi in the Northern Japan Alps. It is seen here from Taisho-ike pond to its ENE. The small andesitic stratovolcano contains a 300-m-wide crater at its summit, and explosion craters are found on the SE and northern flanks. Frequent small-to-moderate phreatic eruptions have occurred during the 20th century from both summit and flank vents. An eruption in 1915 produced a mudflow that created Taisho-ike pond and killed the trees in the foreground.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1977 (Smithsonian Institution).
A mudflow during an eruption of Yake-dake volcano in 1915 dammed the Azusa-gawa river, forming the Taisho-ike pond, and leaving these standing dead trees. The 1915 eruption began on June 6 from a 1-km-long fissure that extended from the summit down the ESE flank. About 50 craters opened along the fissure, but the principal activity took place from the upper end of the fissure.

Photo by Lee Siebert (Smithsonian Institution).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Japan Meteorological Agency, 1996. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (second edition). Tokyo: Japan Meteorological Agency, 502 p (in Japanese).

Japan Meteorological Agency, 2013. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (fourth edition, English version). Japan Meteorological Agency.

Kuno H, 1962. Japan, Taiwan and Marianas. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 11: 1-332.

Miyake Y, Ossaka J, 1998. Steam explosion of Feburary 11th, 1995 at Nakanoyu Hot Spring, Nagano Prefecture, central Japan. Bull Volc Soc Japan (Kazan), 43: 113-121 (in Japanese with English abs).

Murai I, 1962. A brief note on the eruption of the Yake-dake volcano of June 17, 1962. Bull Earthq Res Inst, Univ Tokyo, 40: 805-814.

Nakano S, Yamamoto T, Iwaya T, Itoh J, Takada A, 2001-. Quaternary Volcanoes of Japan. Geol Surv Japan, AIST, http://www.aist.go.jp/RIODB/strata/VOL_JP/.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano(es)
Lava dome(s)

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite
Dacite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
995
2,995
156,542
4,595,286

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Yakedake Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.