Harunasan

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 36.477°N
  • 138.851°E

  • 1449 m
    4753 ft

  • 283122
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Harunasan.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Harunasan.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Harunasan.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0550 Jun 1 ± 10 years ± 30 days Unknown Confirmed 5 Anthropology Futatsu-dake
0520 Jun 1 ± 10 years ± 30 days Unknown Confirmed 4 Anthropology Futatsu-dake
0450 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology Futatsu-dake

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Haruna volcano is truncated by a small summit caldera containing the symmetrical post-caldera cone of Haruna-Fuji (right). Viscous lava flows and lava domes were extruded within and around the caldera. Its western side is currently filled by Lake Haruna, which is visible to the left of Haruna-Fuji. The Futatsu-dake lava dome, outside the caldera to the east, was the source of two large explosive eruptions during the 6th century CE. This view from the NE also shows steaming Asama volcano on the distant horizon above Lake Haruna.

Photo by Ichio Moriya (Kanazawa University).
See title for photo information.
Haruna volcano has an irregular profile as seen from an archaeological site to the ENE. The high peak at the left center is Futatsu-dake lava dome, the source of two large explosive eruptions during the 5th and 6th centuries. Tephra layers from both Haruna and Asama volcanoes buried structures at the archaeological site.

Photo by Tom Simkin, 1993 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The summit of Haruna volcano, seen here from near Maebashi City, SE of the volcano, has a very irregular profile. The volcano is truncated by a caldera and modified by the emplacement of many post-caldera lava domes inside the caldera and on its rim and flanks. Futatsu-dake, the high peak at the right, was the source of two major explosive eruptions from Haruna during the 5th and 6th centuries. These were the last eruptions from Haruna.

Photo by Tom Simkin, 1993 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The symmetrical cone of Haruna-Fuji is one of many Japanese volcanoes named after the country's most renowned landmark. Haruna-Fuji, a post-caldera cone of Haruna volcano, rises here above Lake Haruna on the western side of the caldera. The Futatsu-dake lava dome to the east was the source of two large explosive eruptions during the 6th century CE.

Photo by Yukio Hayakawa, 1998 (Gunma University).
See title for photo information.
The irregular profile of Haruna volcano is seen here from the campus of Gunma University in the city of Maebashi, SE of the volcano. A small caldera truncates the summit of Haruna; several post-caldera cones and lava domes produce the volcano's rugged skyline. Two major explosive eruptions during the 6th century CE originated from the Futatsu-dake lava dome on the eastern side of the volcano.

Photo by Yukio Hayakawa, 1998 (Gunma University).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Harunasan in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites