Nasudake

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 37.125°N
  • 139.963°E

  • 1915 m
    6281 ft

  • 283150
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Bulletin Report: July 1996 (BGVN 21:07)


Seismic activity increases

High seismicity was recorded on 14 July with a total of 14 earthquakes. The Nasu volcano group consists of a N-S cluster of stratovolcanoes and lava domes at the N end of the Kanto plain. Nasu volcanics date back at least 350,000 years. The youngest dome, Chausu-dake, is late Holocene in age and has had several severe explosive eruptions since its first historical eruption in the late 14th century.

Information Contacts: Volcanological Division, Japan Meteorological Agency, 1-3-4 Ote-machi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100, Japan

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Nasudake.

Index of Bulletin Reports


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

03/1977 (NSEB 02:03) Earthquake swarm with felt events

10/1985 (SEAN 10:10) Two earthquake swarms

07/1996 (BGVN 21:07) Seismic activity increases




Bulletin Reports

All information contained in these reports is preliminary and subject to change.


03/1977 (NSEB 02:03) Earthquake swarm with felt events

An earthquake swarm including felt shocks occurred on 30-31 January, but no surface phenomena were observed.

Information Contacts: JMA, Tokyo.

10/1985 (SEAN 10:10) Two earthquake swarms

Local seismic activity increased 9-12 September at the N foot, about 10 km from the summit. Magnitude [3.5] events recorded on 9 and 11 September were felt at intensity I and II at a town 7 km NW of the summit, but were not felt at the JMA Nasudake Volcano Observatory, about 19 km to the SSE.

Another swarm of small earthquakes occurred [27-29 September] at the NE foot, about 10 km from the summit. Three larger events were felt at Kashi hot spring, 7 km NE of the summit, but again none were felt at the JMA Observatory. The JMA seismic network in this area could not accurately determine hypocenters and magnitudes of small events. The largest events of this swarm were estimated to be roughly magnitude 2.7. Earthquake swarms are common around Nasu.

Information Contacts: JMA, Tokyo.

07/1996 (BGVN 21:07) Seismic activity increases

High seismicity was recorded on 14 July with a total of 14 earthquakes. The Nasu volcano group consists of a N-S cluster of stratovolcanoes and lava domes at the N end of the Kanto plain. Nasu volcanics date back at least 350,000 years. The youngest dome, Chausu-dake, is late Holocene in age and has had several severe explosive eruptions since its first historical eruption in the late 14th century.

Information Contacts: Volcanological Division, Japan Meteorological Agency, 1-3-4 Ote-machi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100, Japan

The Nasudake volcanic group consists of a N-S-trending cluster of stratovolcanoes and lava domes at the north end of the Kanto Plain. Volcanic activity dates back about 500,000 years. Growth of three large basaltic-to-dacitic stratovolcanoes with life spans of about 200,000 years was followed by construction of three smaller andesitic stratovolcanoes, Asahidake, Futamatayama, and Chausudake. Activity during the last 55,000 years included the collapse of Asahidake volcano about 30-40,000 years ago producing the massive Ofujisan debris-avalanche deposit, which blankets a broad area SE of the volcano. The youngest volcano, Chausudake, began forming about 16,000 years ago. Six magmatic eruptions took place since then, the latest in 1408-1410, when the youngest summit lava dome, Chausudake, was formed. These eruptions produced block-and-ash flows and concluded with the extrusion of lava flows. Smaller phreatic eruptions have occurred every few hundred years during the past 5000 years.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1963 Nov 20 1963 Nov 21 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Chausu-dake (west side)
[ 1963 Jul 10 ] [ 1963 Jul 11 ] Uncertain 1   Chausu-dake
1960 Oct 10 (?) Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Chausu-dake (50 m north of 1953 vent)
1953 Oct 24 1953 Oct 29 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Chausu-dake (1881 crater)
1881 Jul 1 Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Chausu-dake (west and NW side of summit)
1846 Aug Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Chausu-dake
1410 Mar 5 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Chausu-dake
1408 Feb 24 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Chausu-dake, CH6 tephra
1404 Feb 11 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Chausu-dake
1397 Feb 17 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Chausu-dake
0330 ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Radiocarbon (corrected) Chausu-dake, Ns-7 to 5 tephras
0250 ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (corrected) Chausu-dake, Ns-8 tephra
0250 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology Chausu-dake, Ns-12 to 9 tephras
0700 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (corrected) Chausu-dake, CH5 tephra
1440 BCE ± 500 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology Chausu-dake
2000 BCE ± 1450 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology Chausu-dake
4350 BCE ± 950 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology Chausu-dake
5550 BCE ± 500 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (corrected) Chausu-dake, CH4 tephra
6050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology Chausu-dake
7850 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (corrected) Chausu-dake, CH3 tephra
8550 BCE ± 1500 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology Chausu-dake

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Synonyms

Naso | Nasu-yama | Nasu

Cones

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Asahi-dake Stratovolcano
Futamata-yama Stratovolcano
Kasshi-Asahi-dake Stratovolcano
Minami-Gassan Stratovolcano
Nangetsu-yama Stratovolcano 1776 m
Sanbonyari Stratovolcano 1915 m

Domes

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Chausu-dake
    Tyausu-dake
Dome 1915 m 37° 7' 18" N 139° 57' 58" E

Thermal

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Nasu-Yumoto Spa Thermal 800 m
Sessho-ishi
    Sessyo-isi
Thermal
A line of hikers at the lower left navigate a trail below the steaming summit of Chausu-dake, the active cone of the Nasu volcanic complex. The Nasu volcano group consists of a N-S-trending cluster of stratovolcanoes and lava domes at the north end of the Kanto Plain. The youngest volcano, Chausu-dake, began forming about 16,000 years ago. The last of six magmatic eruptions took place in 1408-1410 AD, when the youngest summit lava dome was formed. More frequent smaller phreatic eruptions have occurred during historical time.

Photo by Yukio Hayakawa, 1994 (Gunma University).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Ban M, Yamamoto T, 2002. Petrological study of the Nasu-Chausudake volcano (ca. 16 ka to Present), northeastern Japan. Bull Volc, 64: 100-116.

Japan Meteorological Agency, 1996. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (second edition). Tokyo: Japan Meteorological Agency, 502 p (in Japanese).

Japan Meteorological Agency, 2013. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (fourth edition, English version). Japan Meteorological Agency.

Kudo T, Hoshizumi H, 2006-. Catalog of eruptive events within the last 10,000 years in Japan, database of Japanese active volcanoes. Geol Surv Japan, AIST, http://riodb02.ibase.aist.go.jp/db099/eruption/index.html.

Kuno H, 1962. Japan, Taiwan and Marianas. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 11: 1-332.

Nakano S, Yamamoto T, Iwaya T, Itoh J, Takada A, 2001-. Quaternary Volcanoes of Japan. Geol Surv Japan, AIST, http://www.aist.go.jp/RIODB/strata/VOL_JP/.

Suzuki T, 1996. Discharge rates of fallout tephra and frequency of plinian eruptions during the last 400,000 years in the southern Northeast Japan arc. Quat Internatl, 34-36: 79-87.

Suzuki T, 1992. Tephrochronological study on Nasu volcano. Bull Volc Soc Japan (Kazan), 37: 251-263 (in Japanese with English abs).

Yamamoto T, 1997. Eruptive history of Nasu-Chausudake volcano, NE Japan, based on tephrostratigraphy. J Geol Soc Japan, 103: 676-691 (in Japanese with English abs).

Yamamoto T, Ban M, 1997. Geological map of Nasu volcano. Geol Surv Japan, 1:30,000 geologic map and text.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano(es)
Lava dome(s)

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite
Basalt / Picro-Basalt
Dacite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
639
5,802
298,717
5,725,203

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Nasudake Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.