Etorofu-Atosanupuri [Atosanupuri]

Photo of this volcano
  • Japan - administered by Russia
  • Kuril Islands
  • Stratovolcano
  • 1932 CE
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 44.808°N
  • 147.131°E

  • 1206 m
    3956 ft

  • 290050
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Etorofu-Atosanupuri [Atosanupuri].

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Etorofu-Atosanupuri [Atosanupuri].

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Etorofu-Atosanupuri [Atosanupuri].

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1932 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1812 Sep 5 ± 4 days Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Atsonupuri stratovolcano forms a peninsula jutting into the Sea of Okhotsk. Seen here from the NE, it is joined to the southern end of Iturup Island by a low isthmus only 30 m high. A late-Pleistocene or early Holocene stratovolcano formed an island that was later connected to Iturup. A 2-km-wide caldera was overtopped by a central cone that forms the present 1206-m-high summit. Strombolian eruptions have dominated the history of this basaltic volcano.

Photo by A. Y. Antonov (courtesy of Oleg Volynets, Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
Conical Atsonupuri stratovolcano, it summit dappled by light snowfall, is seen here from the SW. The volcano forms a prominent peninsula joined to the SW side of Iturup Island. A 2-km-wide caldera was subsequently largely overtopped by a central cone that forms the present 1206-m-high summit. Strombolian eruptions have dominated the history of this basaltic volcano, leaving slopes susceptible to slumping and erosion. Only two historical eruptions are known at Atsonupuri, during 1812 and 1932.

Photo by Alexander Rybin, 2001 (Institute of Marine Geology and Geophysics, Yuzhno-Sakhalin).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Etorofu-Atosanupuri [Atosanupuri] in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites