Carlisle

Photo of this volcano
  • United States
  • Alaska
  • Stratovolcano
  • 1828 CE
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 52.894°N
  • 170.054°W

  • 1620 m
    5314 ft

  • 311230
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Bulletin Report: November 1987 (SEAN 12:11) Citation IconCite this Report


Ash emission observed but site uncertain

At 1359 on 16 November, pilots Dave Holman and Jay Brown (U.S. Coast Guard) noted steam with some ash being emitted from the summit vent of a volcano that they believed to be Carlisle. The plume rose to 2,500 m altitude . . . and trailed 30 km ENE. Of the five islands in the immediate area, the pilots were able to see the three closest to the Bering Sea (Kagamil, Uliaga, and Carlisle), but could not see the islands closer to the Pacific Ocean (Herbert or Chuginadak). Although their report strongly suggested that Carlisle was the source of the activity, the possibility that it was from Mt. Cleveland (10 km SE on Chuginadak Island), site of recent ash emission (SEAN 12:6-8), could not be eliminated. Steam (but no ash) was emerging from Carlisle's summit when it was observed on 28 August.

Information Contacts: J. Reeder, ADGGS.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Carlisle.

Bulletin Reports - Index


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

11/1987 (SEAN 12:11) Ash emission observed but site uncertain




Information is preliminary and subject to change. All times are local (unless otherwise noted)


November 1987 (SEAN 12:11) Citation IconCite this Report


Ash emission observed but site uncertain

At 1359 on 16 November, pilots Dave Holman and Jay Brown (U.S. Coast Guard) noted steam with some ash being emitted from the summit vent of a volcano that they believed to be Carlisle. The plume rose to 2,500 m altitude . . . and trailed 30 km ENE. Of the five islands in the immediate area, the pilots were able to see the three closest to the Bering Sea (Kagamil, Uliaga, and Carlisle), but could not see the islands closer to the Pacific Ocean (Herbert or Chuginadak). Although their report strongly suggested that Carlisle was the source of the activity, the possibility that it was from Mt. Cleveland (10 km SE on Chuginadak Island), site of recent ash emission (SEAN 12:6-8), could not be eliminated. Steam (but no ash) was emerging from Carlisle's summit when it was observed on 28 August.

Information Contacts: J. Reeder, ADGGS.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1987 Nov 16 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1838 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1828 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations
1774 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Carlisle volcano is a steep-sided, 1620-m-high stratovolcano that rises across the Carlisle Pass strait from Mount Cleveland. Several poorly documented eruptions have been recorded since the 18th century. Carlisle is one of group of volcanoes in the "Islands of Four Mountains" area of the central Aleutians.

Photo by Michelle Harbin, 1994 (courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Volcano Observatory).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Carlisle in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites