Recheschnoi

Photo of this volcano
  • United States
  • Alaska
  • Stratovolcano
  • Unknown - Evidence Credible
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 53.157°N
  • 168.539°W

  • 1984 m
    6508 ft

  • 311280
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Recheschnoi.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Recheschnoi.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Recheschnoi.

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Eruptive History


The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Recheschnoi. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Recheschnoi page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

Deformation History


There is data available for 3 deformation periods. Expand each entry for additional details.


Deformation during 2003 - 2010 [Uplift; Observed by InSAR]

Start Date: 2003 Stop Date: 2010 Direction: Uplift Method: InSAR
Magnitude: Unknown Spatial Extent: Unknown Latitude: Unknown Longitude: Unknown

Remarks: Uplift near Geyser Bight and Hot Springs Cove due to magma intrusion and/or hydorthermal pressurization.

Averaged deformation images of Mount Vsevidof and Mount Recheshnoi and surrounding area produced by stacking Envisat InSAR images acquired during 2003?2010 along descending tracks 344 and 115. A full cycle of colors (i.e., one interferometric fringe) represents 10 mm/year of surface displacement along the LOS

From: Lu and Dzurisin 2014.


Reference List: Lu and Dzurisin 2014.

Full References:

Lubis, A. M., 2014. Uplift of Kelud Volcano Prior to the November 2007 Eruption as Observed by L-Band Insar. Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences, 46(3), 245-257.

Deformation during 2003 - 2010 [Subsidence; Observed by InSAR]

Start Date: 2003 Stop Date: 2010 Direction: Subsidence Method: InSAR
Magnitude: Unknown Spatial Extent: Unknown Latitude: Unknown Longitude: Unknown

Remarks: Localized subsidence superimposed on a broad inflation signal, centered SE of Geyser Bight. Probably due to depressurization or degassing of the hydrothermal system.

Averaged deformation images of Mount Vsevidof and Mount Recheshnoi and surrounding area produced by stacking Envisat InSAR images acquired during 2003?2010 along descending tracks 344 and 115. A full cycle of colors (i.e., one interferometric fringe) represents 10 mm/year of surface displacement along the LOS

From: Lu and Dzurisin 2014.


Reference List: Lu and Dzurisin 2014.

Full References:

Lubis, A. M., 2014. Uplift of Kelud Volcano Prior to the November 2007 Eruption as Observed by L-Band Insar. Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences, 46(3), 245-257.

Deformation during 2003 - 2010 [Subsidence; Observed by InSAR]

Start Date: 2003 Stop Date: 2010 Direction: Subsidence Method: InSAR
Magnitude: Unknown Spatial Extent: Unknown Latitude: Unknown Longitude: Unknown

Remarks: Subsidence near Hot Springs Cove, probably due to depressurization or degassing of the hydrothermal system.

Averaged deformation images of Mount Vsevidof and Mount Recheshnoi and surrounding area produced by stacking Envisat InSAR images acquired during 2003?2010 along descending tracks 344 and 115. A full cycle of colors (i.e., one interferometric fringe) represents 10 mm/year of surface displacement along the LOS

From: Lu and Dzurisin 2014.


Reference List: Lu and Dzurisin 2014.

Full References:

Lubis, A. M., 2014. Uplift of Kelud Volcano Prior to the November 2007 Eruption as Observed by L-Band Insar. Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences, 46(3), 245-257.

Emission History


There is no Emissions History data available for Recheschnoi.

Photo Gallery


Russian Bay valley is located on the NE flank of the heavily eroded Recheschnoi volcano. Glacial dissection is most pronounced on the NE side. However, this side of the volcano also contains some Holocene rhyolitic lava domes and a large thermal area that includes a geyser.

Photo by Chris Nye (Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys).
See title for photo information.
Mount Recheschnoi is a 1984-m stratovolcano on Umnak Island that has been extensively dissected by glaciers. This 1985 view from the SW shows the elongated NE-SW-trending summit ridge, which is dissected by deep valleys. Although no historical eruptions are known, Holocene pyroclastic cones and lava domes occur on the east and west flanks, and a large thermal area including hot springs and a geyser is found on the NE flank.

Photo by Chris Nye (Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys).
See title for photo information.
The effects of erosion are visible in this view from the SW of two prominent stratovolcanoes on SW Umnak Island in the Aleutians. Mount Vsevidof (left) is a symmetrical, constructional volcano where frequent eruptions, which have continued into historical time, have overcome the effects of erosion. Recheschnoi volcano (right), in contrast, has been inactive for longer periods of time and has been extensively dissected by glaciers. Only small pyroclastic cones and lava domes have erupted during the past 10,000 years.

Photo by Chris Nye, 1985 (Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Recheschnoi in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites