Griggs

Photo of this volcano
  • United States
  • Alaska
  • Stratovolcano
  • 1790 BCE
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 58.354°N
  • 155.092°W

  • 2317 m
    7600 ft

  • 312190
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Griggs.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Griggs.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Griggs.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1790 BCE ± 40 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Griggs volcano, 2265-m-high, is the highest of a group of volcanoes in the Katmai area. It lies 10 km behind the volcanic arc defined by other Katmai group volcanoes. Griggs is only slightly dissected and is largely of Holocene age. Although no historical eruptions have been reported from Griggs, vigorously active fumarolic fields persist in a summit crater and along the upper SW flank. The slopes of Griggs are heavily mantled by fallout from the 1912 Novarupta eruption in this 1990 view from the SW.

Photo by Game McGimsey, 1990 (U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Volcano Observatory).
See title for photo information.
Mount Griggs, seen here from the west rim of Katmai caldera, is a 2265-m stratovolcano that lies west of a NE-trending arc of volcanoes cutting across Katmai National Park. No historical eruptions are known from this largely Holocene volcano. Noisy fumarolic jets at the summit of Griggs can be heard from long distances.

Photo by Game McGimsey (Alaska Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
Geologists walk toward 2265-m-high Griggs volcano from the base of Knife Creek Glacier to its south. The relatively unmodified slopes of the volcano reflect its largely Holocene age. Although no historical eruptions have been reported from Griggs, vigorously active fumarolic fields persist in a summit crater and along the upper SW flank. Noisy fumarole jets can be heard from the valley floor. The slopes of Griggs and the surface of Knife Creek Glacier are heavily mantled by gray fallout from the 1912 Novarupta eruption.

Photo by Game McGimsey (Alaska Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Griggs in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites