Douglas

Photo of this volcano
  • United States
  • Alaska
  • Stratovolcano
  • Unknown - Evidence Credible
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 58.855°N
  • 153.542°W

  • 2140 m
    7019 ft

  • 312270
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Douglas.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Douglas.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Douglas.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Douglas. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Douglas page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The Global Volcanism Program has no synonyms or subfeatures listed for Douglas.

Photo Gallery


The broad, glacier-covered Mount Douglas stratovolcano rises to 2140 m across Kamishak Bay as seen from Augustine Island to its NE. Douglas volcano anchors the northern tip of the Alaskan Peninsula. The rocks in the foreground are part of a young debris-avalanche deposit from Augustine volcano.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1986 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Mount Douglas, a dissected and largely ice-covered, 2140-m-high stratovolcano at the northern tip of the Alaska Peninsula, is viewed here from the north. The volcano contains a youthful-looking, fumarolically active summit crater filled by a warm, acidic lake, but the presence of Holocene lava flows or tephra deposits has not been confirmed.

Photo by Chris Nye (Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Alaska Volcano Observatory).
See title for photo information.
The summit of 2140-m-high Douglas volcano on the northern tip of the Alaska Peninsula contains a warm and highly acidic crater lake approximately 160 m wide. An active fumarole field is also found on the shores of the crater lake of this glacier-covered stratovolcano.

Photo by Christina Neal (Alaska Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
Steam rises from an active fumarolic area on the north side (left center) of the summit lake at Douglas volcano on the northern tip of the Alaska Peninsula. The small, 160-m-wide crater is one of the few ice-free areas on Douglas volcano. In 1992, the lake had a pH of 1.1 and a temperature of 21 degrees Centigrade.

Photo by Chris Nye (Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys).
See title for photo information.
Sulfur crystals line the edges of a fumarolic vent near the margin of a summit lake at Douglas volcano on the northern tip of the Alaska Peninsula.

Photo by Chris Nye (Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Douglas in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites