Imuruk Lake

Photo of this volcano
  • United States
  • Alaska
  • Shield(s)
  • 300 CE
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 65.517°N
  • 163.45°W

  • 610 m
    2001 ft

  • 314060
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Imuruk Lake.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Imuruk Lake.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Imuruk Lake.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0300 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Lost Jim Cone

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


The Imuruk Lake volcanic field derives it name from the lake near the center of this NASA Landsat image (with north to the top) of the central Seward Peninsula. The Oligocene-to-Holocene Imuruk monogenetic volcanic field contains around 75 small basaltic vents surrounded by voluminous lava flows. The gray-colored lava flow extending across the left-center portion of this image originated from the Lost Jim cone SW of Imuruk Lake and traveled 35 km to the west. The snow-covered Bendeleben Mountains lie at the bottom of the image.

NASA Landsat7 image (worldwind.arc.nasa.gov)
See title for photo information.
The Lost Jim lava flow extending to the right across this NASA Landsat image (with north to the top) originated from the Lost Jim cinder cone, SW of Imuruk Lake. The flow was erupted about 1655 years ago and is the only Holocene lava flow of the Imuruk Lake volcanic field. The small 30-m-high cone with a 30-m-wide crater produced a voluminous basaltic lava flow that traveled 35 km to the west and covered an area of about 230 sq km.

NASA Landsat7 image (worldwind.arc.nasa.gov)
See title for photo information.
Lava flows of the Imuruk Lake volcanic field are seen in this image taken with color infrared film. The Oligocene-to-Holocene Imuruk monogenetic volcanic field in the central Seward Peninsula north of the Bendeleben Mountains contains around 75 small basaltic vents surrounded by voluminous lava flows. The largest and most recent vent is the Lost Jim cone, a 30-m-high cinder cone near Imuruk Lake that produced the only Holocene lava flow of the Imuruk field.

Photo by K.G. Dean, 1980 (Alaska Volcano Observatory/University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Imuruk Lake in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites