Garibaldi Lake

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 49.92°N
  • 123.03°W

  • 2316 m
    7596 ft

  • 320190
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Garibaldi Lake.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Garibaldi Lake.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Garibaldi Lake.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Garibaldi Lake. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Garibaldi Lake page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


The Garibaldi Lake volcanic field consists of nine small stratovolcanoes and volcanic vents of Pleistocene to Holocene age around scenic Garibaldi Lake, seen here with Mount Garibaldi in the background. Mount Price, in the center of the photo, is a small andesitic stratovolcano. Clinker Peak, on its west flank, produced two Holocene lava flows that dammed Rubble Creek at the right-hand margin of this photo, forming Garibaldi Lake.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1983 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The low ridge in the center of the photo consists of early Holocene lava flows that originated from Clinker Peak on Mount Price to the south (left). The lava flows ponded against the retreating continental glacier that filled the Cheakamus River valley to a depth of 1000 m, and formed a barrier that created Garibaldi Lake.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1983 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The unvegetated cliff along Rubble Creek is the margin of the early Holocene lava flows that created Garibaldi Lake. The steep-sided lava-flow margin formed when the flow ponded against the retreating continental glacier filling the Cheakamus River valley. The oversteepened flow margin has been the source of several landslides down Rubble Creek, leaving a scarp known as The Barrier.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1983 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The spectacular Black Tusk, towering above a flower-covered mountain meadow, is a glacially eroded lava dome from the earliest stage of activity of the Garibaldi Lake volcanic field about 1 million years ago. The light-colored ridge to the right is a glacial moraine.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1983 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The irregular mound in the center of the photo is Cinder Cone, a late-Pleistocene cone of the Garibaldi Lake volcanic field. The pyroclastic cone was formed during two periods of activity, the lastest of which produced a lava flow down the glaciated valley to the north.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1983 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Garibaldi Lake in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites