Mono Lake Volcanic Field

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 38°N
  • 119.03°W

  • 2121 m
    6957 ft

  • 323110
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Mono Lake Volcanic Field.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Mono Lake Volcanic Field.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Mono Lake Volcanic Field.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1890 Aug 23 (?) ] [ 1890 Aug 23 (?) ] Uncertain    
1790 ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Paoha Island
1550 ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Negit Island
1150 ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Hydration Rind Paoha Island
0350 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Negit Island, capped by the dark-colored cinder cone at the right, was the source of one of the most recent eruptions of the Mono Lake volcanic field. Rhyodacitic lava flows overlie a 1240 CE tephra unit. The light-colored tufa deposits near the western shore of Mono Lake in the foreground were created by deposition of calcium carbonate beneath the waters of the lake.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1973 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Paoha Island in the center of Mono Lake at the left is seen from the flanks of Panum Crater on the south, at the northern end of the Mono Craters. The Mono Lake volcanic field consists of multiple volcanic vents on the northern shore of the lake and on Paoha and Negit Islands, which were last active a few hundred years ago.

Photo by Dan Dzurisin, 1982 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
The Mono Lake volcanic field consists of rhyolitic lava domes and flows, phreatic explosion craters, and cinder cones on islands in Mono Lake and on its northern shore. This view shows explosion craters on Paoha Island, with the Mono Craters dome complex and the Sierra Nevada in the distance to the south. The ages of the most recent eruptions of the Mono Lake volcanic field range from about 2000 to about 200 years.

Photo by Dan Dzurisin, 1983 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
Negit (right-center) and Paoha (far right) islands in Mono Lake are seen from Black Point, a basaltic cone on the NW shore of the lake. The most recent eruptive activity from the Mono Lakes volcanic field took place 100-230 years ago, when lake-bottom sediments forming much of Paoha Island were uplifted by intrusion of a rhyolitic cryptodome. Black Point is an initially sublacustral cone that formed about 13,300 years ago when the lake was higher. The White Mountains form the far right horizon.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1997 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Mono Lake Volcanic Field in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites