Mono Craters

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 37.88°N
  • 119°W

  • 2796 m
    9171 ft

  • 323120
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Mono Craters.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Mono Craters.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Mono Craters.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1350 ± 20 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Dendrochronology Panum Crater and nearby vents
1000 ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Hydration Rind Dome on NW edge of NW Coulee
0620 ± 27 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (corrected) South Coulee
0490 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) NW Coulee and Pumice Pit dome
0440 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Southern Mono Craters
0320 ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) South Coulee?
0010 ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) South Coulee?
0700 BCE ± 800 years Unknown Confirmed   Hydration Rind Central Mono Craters
3850 BCE ± 1160 years Unknown Confirmed   Hydration Rind Crater north of Punchbowl
6750 BCE ± 1740 years Unknown Confirmed   Hydration Rind Punchbowl

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


The Mono Craters volcanic field, between Mono Lake in the foreground and Long Valley caldera at the upper left, is a 17-km-long chain of rhyolitic lava domes and thick, viscous lava flows. Mono Craters have been frequently active during the Holocene. Panum crater (the vent nearest to Mono Lake), is partially filled by a lava dome and was the site of the latest eruption from Mono Craters, about 600 years ago.

Photo by R. Von Huene, 1971 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
The hackly surfaced Panum lava dome, filling a tephra ring at the northern end of the Mono Craters chain, was one of five rhyolitic lava domes and flows emplaced at the end of a major eruption about 600 years ago. The eruption, which began with powerful plinian explosive eruptions accompanied by pyroclastic flows and surges, occurred just a year or two prior to another major eruption at Inyo Craters to the south.

Photo by Dan Dzurisin, 1982 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
Flow-banded rhyolitic obsidian of the Panum Crater lava dome was erupted about 600 years ago at the northern end of the Mono Craters. The greenish-yellow areas are lichens on the surface of the dome.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1973 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The Mono Craters volcanic field south of Mono Lake at the upper left, is a 17-km-long arcuate chain of rhyolitic lava domes and thick, viscous lava flows. Mono Craters has been frequently active throughout the Holocene, along with the Inyo Craters chain to the south. The Inyo Craters chain, which includes the Wilson Butte, Obsidian and Glass Creek domes, which are oriented diagonally along a N-S line from the left center to lower right of the photo. The latest eruptions of Mono Craters and Inyo Craters occurred nearly simultaneously around 600 years ago.

Photo by Roy Bailey, 1980 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
The Mono Craters volcanic field, seen here from the NW, is a 17-km-long arcuate chain of lava domes, lava flows, and tephra rings. The latest eruptions took place about 600 years ago from several vents at the northern end of the chain, producing rhyolitic lava domes and flows.

Photo by Victoria Avery, 1992 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


The following 52 samples associated with this volcano can be found in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections. Catalog number links will open a window with more information.

Catalog Number Sample Description
NMNH 108305 Basalt
NMNH 111123-59 Rhyolitic pumice
NMNH 111123-60 Rhyolitic obsidian
NMNH 115401-1 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-1 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-10 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-11 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-12 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-13 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-14 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-15 Pumice
NMNH 117460-16 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-17 Pumice
NMNH 117460-18 Pumice
NMNH 117460-19 Pumice
NMNH 117460-2 Pumice
NMNH 117460-20 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-21 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-22 Perlite
NMNH 117460-23 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-24 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-25 Glass
NMNH 117460-26 Pumice
NMNH 117460-27 Pumice
NMNH 117460-28 Pumice
NMNH 117460-29 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-3 Glass
NMNH 117460-4 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-5 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-6 Pumice
NMNH 117460-7 Obsidian
NMNH 117460-8 Pumice
NMNH 117460-9 Obsidian
NMNH 22898 Obsidian
NMNH 29631-1 Obsidian
NMNH 29631-2 Obsidian
NMNH 29631-3 Rhyolite
NMNH 29631-4 Obsidian
NMNH 29631-5 Hyalo liparite
NMNH 29631-6 Hyalo liparite
NMNH 29633 Lapilli
NMNH 35271 Obsidian
NMNH 35272-1 Obsidian
NMNH 35272-2 Obsidian
NMNH 35273 Obsidian
NMNH 37209 Pumice
NMNH 37210 Pumice
NMNH 37211 Pumice
NMNH 37211-1 Pumice
NMNH 37211-2 Pumice
NMNH 37216 Hypersthene andesite
NMNH 76718 Tufa

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