Naolinco Volcanic Field

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 19.67°N
  • 96.75°W

  • 2000 m
    6560 ft

  • 341095
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Naolinco Volcanic Field.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Naolinco Volcanic Field.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Naolinco Volcanic Field.

The Naolinco volcanic field in the Sierra de Chiconquiaco range north of Jalapa (Xalapa), the capital city of the state of Veracruz, consists of a broad area of scattered Quaternary pyroclastic cones and associated dominantly basaltic lava flows. Late-Pleistocene to Holocene pyroclastic cones cover an E-W-trending area on both sides of the town of Naolinco de Victoria. The largest cone is 2000-m-high Cerro Acatlán, located NE of Naolinco de Victoria. This and other nearby cones have fed voluminous lava flows that traveled down regional gradients to the south and SE. The Coacoatzintla lava flow from the Rincón de Chapultepec scoria cone in the western part of the field was erupted about 3000 years ago and is the youngest flow of the Naolinco volcanic field.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1200 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) Rincón de Chapultepec

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.



Synonyms
Naolinca de Victoria Volcanic Field


Cones
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Acatlán, Cerro Cinder cone 2000 m 19° 41' 0" N 96° 51' 0" W
Bolsa, Cerro la Cinder cone 1000 m 19° 37' 0" N 96° 40' 0" W
Cerrito, Cerro el Cinder cone 1780 m 19° 40' 0" N 97° 0' 0" W
Gordo, Cerro Cinder cone 1780 m 19° 40' 0" N 96° 55' 0" W
Gordo, Cerro Cinder cone 980 m 19° 35' 0" N 96° 50' 0" W
Hoyo, Cerro el Cinder cone 1680 m 19° 42' 0" N 96° 49' 0" W
Liborio, Cerro Cinder cone 1230 m 19° 40' 0" N 96° 41' 0" W
Pastores, Cerro Cinder cone 1140 m 19° 39' 0" N 96° 41' 0" W
The Naolinco volcanic field consists of a broad area of scattered Quaternary pyroclastic cones and associated dominantly basaltic lava flows north of the city of Jalapa, the capital city of the state of Veracruz. The largest cone is 2000-m-high Cerro Acatlán (seen on the center-horizon), which is located NE of the town of Naolinco de Victoria. This and other nearby cones have fed lava flows that traveled to the south and SE. The barren area in the foreground is part of the Río Naolinco lava flow erupted from vents on the NE flank of Cofre de Perote volcano.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).
The Coacoatzintla lava flow that fills this valley floor originated from a vent at the base of Rincón de Chapultepec crater (left foreground). The flow was dated at about 3000 years ago and underlies the present-day town of Coacoatzintla, which lies in front of the dark-colored hill below the right horizon. The flow, which traveled 6 km to the south, diverted around the hill (formed of limestone bedrock) into the valley of the Río Naolinco, which extends from right to left in the distance. This eruption is the youngest known from the Naolinco volcanic field.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2000 (Smithsonian Institution).
The rounded ridge in the partial sunlight in the foreground is the tephra-mantled surface of a lava flow erupted from the base of the Rincón de Chapultepec scoria cone about 3000 years ago. This thick, viscous 50-m-high lobe was extruded for a distance of 2 km to the south on top of an earlier olivine-basaltic lava flow that filled the valley floor and traveled 6 km from the vent.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2000 (Smithsonian Institution).
A road zig zags up the southern flanks of the Rincón de Chapultepec cinder cone (left center). The well-preserved crater rim is barely visible against a tip of a ridge of the Sierra de Chiconquiaco range on which the cone was constructed. The valley floor is underlain by tephra deposits from Rincón de Chapultepec that overlie a lava flow that issued from the base of the cone. Rincón de Chapultepec formed about 3000 years ago and is the youngest known vent of the Naolinco volcanic field.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2000 (Smithsonian Institution).
The Puebla Vieja pyroclastic cone along the horizon at the left center is one of the westernmost cones of the Naolinco volcanic field. The forested mound in the center of the photo is the distal portion of a lava flow that traveled to the SE down the valley floor in the center of the photo. In the foreground are exposures of the Coacoatzintla lava flow from the Rincón de Chapultepec cone.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2000 (Smithsonian Institution).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Carrasco-Nunez G, Siebert L, Diaz-Castellon R, Vazquez-Selem L, Capra L, 2010. Evolution and hazards of a long-quiescent compound shield-like volcano: Cofre de Perote, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. J Volc Geotherm Res, 197: 209-224.

Ferrari L , Tagami T, Eguchi M, Orozco-Esquivel M T, Petrone C M, Jacobo-Albarran J, Lopez-Martinez M, 2005. Geology, geochronology and tectonic setting of late Cenozoic volcanism along the southwestern Gulf of Mexico: the Eastern Alkaline Province revisited. J Volc Geotherm Res, 146: 284-306.

Gomez-Tuena, LaGatta A B, Langmuir C H, Goldstein S L, Ortega-Gutierrez F, Carrasco-Nunez G, 2003. Temporal control of subduction magmatism in the eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt: mantle sources, slab contributions, and crustal contamination. Geochem Geophys Geosyst, 4(8): 1-33.

Luhr J F, Kimberly P G, Siebert L, Aranda-Gomez J J, Housh T B, Kysar Mattietti G, 2006. Quaternary volcanic rocks: insights from the MEXPET petrological and geochemical database. In: Siebe S, Macias J-L, Aguirre-Diaz G J (eds) Neogone-Quaternary continental margin volcanism: a perspective from Mexico, {Geol Soc Amer Spec Pap}, 402: 1-44.

Negendank J F W, Emmermann R, Krawczyk R, Mooser F, Tobschall H, Werle D, 1985. Geological and geochemical investigations on the eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Geof Internac, 24: 477-575.

Rodriguez S R, Morales-Barrera W, Layer P, Gonzalez-Mercado E, 2010. A quaternary monogenetic volcanic field in the Xalapa region, eastern Trans-Mexican volcanic belt: geology, distribution and morphology of the volcanic vents. J Volc Geotherm Res, 197: 149-166.

Siebert L, Carrasco-Nunez G, 2002. Late-Pleistocene to precolumbian behind-the-arc mafic volcanism in the eastern Mexican Volcanic Belt; implications for future hazards. J Volc Geotherm Res, 115: 179-205.

Volcano Types

Pyroclastic cone(s)

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Basalt / Picro-Basalt
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite
Trachybasalt / Tephrite Basanite
Minor
Trachyandesite / Basaltic trachy-andesite
Trachyte / Trachyandesite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
108,824
108,824
739,767
4,184,323

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Naolinco Volcanic Field Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.