San Martín

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  • Mexico
  • Mexico
  • Shield
  • 1796 CE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 18.57°N
  • 95.2°W

  • 1650 m
    5412 ft

  • 341110
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for San Martín.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for San Martín.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1932 Dec 31 ± 365 days ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1838 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1797 ] [ 1805 ] Uncertain 2  
1794 May 1796 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1793 Mar 2 1793 Dec Confirmed 4 Historical Observations Cinder cones in summit crater
1664 Jan 15 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations SE flank
[ 1534 (?) ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
0890 ± 40 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
0480 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
0380 ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology South flank
0120 ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) South flank (Cerro Puntiagudo)
0150 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology South flank
0750 BCE ± 40 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
1320 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) South flank (Cerro Mono Blanco)
2130 BCE ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
3440 BCE ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Espindola J M, Zamora-Camacho A, Godinez M L, Schaaf P, Rodríguez S R, 2010. The 1793 eruption of San Martin Tuxtla volcano, Veracruz, Mexico. J Volc Geotherm Res, 197: 188-208.

Mooser F, Meyer-Abich H, McBirney A R, 1958. Central America. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 6: 1-146.

Nelson S A, 1990. Volcanic hazards in Mexico--a summary. Univ Nac Auton Mexico Inst Geol, Rev, 9: 71-81.

Nelson S A, Gonzalez-Caver E, 1992. Geology and K-Ar dating of the Tuxtla volcanic field, Veracruz, Mexico. Bull Volc, 55: 85-96.

Nelson S A, Gonzalez-Caver E, Kyser T K, 1995. Constraints on the origin of alkaline and calc-alkaline magmas from the Tuxtla volcanic field, Veracruz, Mexico. Contr Mineral Petr, 122: 191-211.

Reinhardt B K, 1991. Volcanology of the younger volcanic sequence and volcanic hazards study of the Tuxtla volcanic field, Veracruz, Mexico. Unpublished MSci thesis, Tulane Univ, 147 p.

Verma S P, Salazar V A, Negendank J F W, Milan M, Navarro L I, Besch T, 1993. Caracteristicas petrograficas y geoquimicas de elementos mayores del Campo Volcanico de los Tuxtlas, Veracruz, Mexico. Translated Title: Petrography and geochemistry of the major elements in Los Tuxtlas volcanic field, Veracruz, Mexico. Geof Internac, 32: 237-248.

Volcán de San Martín, part of the Tuxtla volcanic field, is a broad alkaline shield volcano that rises above the Gulf of Mexico. The massive volcano, also known as San Martín Tuxtla, is elongated in a NW-SE direction and is capped by a 1-km-wide summit crater. The upper part of the 1650-m-high volcano is covered with dense tropical rain forests. The summit and flanks of San Martín are dotted with more than 250 pyroclastic cones and maars. Well-preserved cinder cones are abundant between the summit of the volcano and Laguna Catemaco on the SE flank. Holocene cones in this area produced ash deposits that buried recently discovered stone pyramids. The two largest historical eruptions of San Martín took place in 1664 and 1793. The 1793 eruption occurred from two cinder cones in the summit crater and produced widespread ashfall and lava flows that extended 3.5 km down the NE flank.