San Martin

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 18.57°N
  • 95.2°W

  • 1650 m
    5412 ft

  • 341110
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for San Martin.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for San Martin.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for San Martin.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1932 Dec 31 ± 365 days ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1838 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1797 ] [ 1805 ] Uncertain 2  
1794 May 1796 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1793 Mar 2 1793 Dec Confirmed 4 Historical Observations Cinder cones in summit crater
1664 Jan 15 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations SE flank
[ 1534 (?) ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
0890 ± 40 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
0480 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
0380 ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology South flank
0120 ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) South flank (Cerro Puntiagudo)
0150 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology South flank
0750 BCE ± 40 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
1320 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) South flank (Cerro Mono Blanco)
2130 BCE ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
3440 BCE ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Volcán San Martín, part of the Tuxtla volcanic field, is a broad alkaline shield volcano on the coast of the Gulf of México. San Martín is elongated in a NW-SE direction. The summit and flanks of the 1650-m-high volcano are dotted with more than 250 pyroclastic cones and maars. The two largest historical eruptions took place in 1664 and 1793. The 1793 eruption occurred from two cinder cones in the 1-km-wide summit crater and produced widespread ashfall and lava flows that extended 3.5 km down the NE flank.

Photo by Steve Nelson, 1986 (Tulane University).
See title for photo information.
The largest historical eruption of San Martín Tuxtla volcano took place in 1793. This drawing shows strombolian eruptions ejecting ash and incandescent bombs from a pyroclastic cone within the summit crater with the Gulf of Mexico in the background. The eruption began on March 2 and lasted until December. Periodic strong ash eruptions occurred from two cinder cones that grew within the 1-km-wide summit crater. Lava flowed through a breach in the rim of the summit crater for a distance of 3.5 km down the northern flank of the volcano.

Drawing from Archivo General de la Nación (México), courtesy of Larry Feldman.
See title for photo information.
An aerial view from the SE shows pyroclastic cones on the flank of the massive San Martín Tuxtla volcano. More than 250 pyroclastic cones and maars dot the flanks of San Martín volcano. They are mostly located along a 40-km-long NW-trending zone parallel to the elongation of the massive shield volcano. Many clusters of cones are aligned in this same direction parallel to regional trends.

Photo by Hugo Delgado-Granados, 1997 (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for San Martin in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites