Cerro Singuil

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.05°N
  • 89.65°W

  • 957 m
    3139 ft

  • 343002
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Cerro Singuil.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Cerro Singuil.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Cerro Singuil.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Cerro Singuil. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Cerro Singuil page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Bedded scoria deposits forming the flanks of a basaltic cinder cone are exposed in a quarry at Cerro Singüil. This cone is the largest of a small cluster of cones in El Salvador's interior valley SE of Volcán Chingo. These cones are part of a broad area of monogenetic basaltic volcanism near the Guatemalan border on the opposite side of the main volcanic front from the Middle-American trench.

Photo by Carlos Pullinger, 1996 (Servicio Nacional de Estudios Territoriales, El Salvador).
See title for photo information.
Cerro Singüil (also known as El Cerrón) is a large youthful-looking scoria cone with a well-preserved crater that lies at the eastern end of a large volcanic field in the interior valley of El Salvador near the Guatemalan border, SE of Volcán Chingo. Cerro Singüil is seen here from the SE along the Pan-American highway, which skirts the eastern flank of the cone.

Photo by Giuseppina Kysar, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The flat-topped summit of Cerro las Tablas is cut by one of a chain of three N-S-trending explosion craters located west of Cerro Singüil in the interior valley of El Salvador. Cerro las Tablas at 1035 m is the highest peak of the Cerro Singüil volcanic field and is seen here from the west.

Photo by Giuseppina Kysar, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Cerro Singüil is a morphologically youthful cone that is nevertheless old enough for a series of radially oriented erosional gullies to have formed on its flanks. The 957-m-high cone rises 250 m above the floor of El Salvador's interior valley and is seen here from the NW, along the Pan-American highway.

Photo by Rick Wunderman, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Cerro Singuil in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites