Chinameca

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 13.478°N
  • 88.33°W

  • 1300 m
    4264 ft

  • 343090
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Chinameca.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Chinameca.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Chinameca.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Chinameca. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Chinameca page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Chinameca is a small stratovolcano with a 2-km-wide, steep-sided summit caldera. It is seen here from the flanks of San Miguel volcano to its SE. The Holocene cone of Cerro el Limbo (left-center) on the western flank rises above the caldera rim, and a Holocene lava flow extends to the north from a NNW-flank vent. The low peak on the far right above the foreground trees is Cerro Partido (also known as El Chimarrón).

Photo by Kristal Dorion, 1994 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
A fumarolic area known as Chinameca 4 is one of several surrounding the city of Chinameca. Temperatures of around 100 degrees Centigrade have been recorded at the fumaroles of Ausoles la Viejona, Ausoles el Boquerón, and Infiernillos de Chinameca. The high heat flow has made this area the object of geothermal exploration.

Photo courtesy of Comisión Ejecutiva Hidroeléctricia del Río Lempa (CEL).
See title for photo information.
Steam rises from fumaroles in an area of hydrothermally altered rock on the northern flank of Chinameca volcano. Fumarole fields surround the city of Chinameca on several sides within a few kilometers of the town. A geothermal potential of 5-55 MW has been identified at Chinameca.

Photo courtesy of Comisión Ejecutiva Hidroeléctricia del Río Lempa (CEL).
See title for photo information.
Flat-lying Chinameca volcano on the center horizon is truncated by a 2-km-wide caldera. The volcano is seen here from the north, with the summit of San Miguel volcano behind it on the left. A cluster of fumarole fields is located on the northern flank of the volcano surrounding the city of Chinameca.

Photo by Carlos Pullinger, 1996 (Servicio Nacional de Estudios Territoriales, El Salvador).
See title for photo information.
Los Infernillos Cantón las Meses thermal area at Chinameca volcano features a cluster of mudpots. This is part of a series of fumarole fields surrounding the city of Chinameca.

Photo by Carlos Pullinger, 1994 (Servicio Nacional de Estudios Territoriales, El Salvador).
See title for photo information.
The Chinameca volcanic complex on the center horizon is seen here from the west beyond the low-angle slopes of the Pleistocene El Tigre volcano in the foreground. The low, flat-topped peak at the right side of the Chinameca complex is Cerro el Limbo, a cone on the western flank of Chinameca caldera. The high conical peak at the upper right is San Miguel volcano, which is separated by a low saddle from Chinameca.

Photo by Carlos Pullinger, 1994 (Servicio Nacional de Estudios Territoriales, El Salvador).
See title for photo information.
Conical San Miguel volcano, one of El Salvador's most prominent landmarks, rises across a low saddle SE of Chinameca (Pacayal) volcano. The 2130-m-high San Miguel is seen here from Cerro el Limbo, a cone on the western flank of Chinameca. The southern side of Chinameca's 2-km-wide summit caldera is visible at the left.

Photo by Carlos Pullinger, 1996 (Servicio Nacional de Estudios Territoriales, El Salvador).
See title for photo information.
Chinameca stratovolcano is seen here from the SE near the summit of neighboring San Miguel volcano. A 2-km-wide, steep-sided caldera, Laguna Seca el Pacayal (right-center), truncates the summit of Chinameca volcano. The Holocene cone of Cerro el Limbo (in the partial shade left of the caldera) on the western flank rises to a point above the level of the caldera rim. A group of fumarole fields is located on the north flank of the volcano near the town of Chinameca, and the volcano has been the site of a geothermal exploration program.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Chinameca volcano, also known as El Pacayal, is seen here to the NW from the barren upper flanks of San Miguel volcano. Coffee plantations mantle the slopes of the 1300-m-high stratovolcano, which is truncated by a 2-km-wide caldera. The high point of the caldera, Cerro el Pacayal, lies on the western rim (left-center) and rises about 450 m above the caldera floor. The rounded peak of Cerro el Limbo at the left rises to above 1380 m, exceeding the height of the caldera rim.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
An E-W-trending chain of volcanoes extends ca. 30 km across eastern El Salvador. The small light-colored dot at the left is Laguna de Alegria, a crater of the Tecapa volcanic complex. No historical eruptions are known from the eroded Usulután and El Tigre volcanoes. The 2-km-wide Laguna Seca el Pacayal caldera is a prominent feature of Chinameca volcano. San Miguel is one of El Salvador's most active volcanoes; the dark area at the lower right is a lava flow from the 1819 eruption. The city of San Miguel is at the upper right.

NASA Space Shuttle image STS61C-31-47, 1986 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Chinameca in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites