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Cuicocha

Photo of this volcano
  • Ecuador
  • South America
  • Caldera
  • 650 CE
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 0.308°N
  • 78.364°W

  • 3246 m
    10647 ft

  • 352003
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number
Most Recent Weekly Report: 10 October-16 October 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

IG reported that, after an earthquake swarm consisting of 62 volcano-tectonic events during 2-3 October, seismicity at Cuicocha returned to background levels on 4 October. Carbon dioxide levels were normal, and deformation data did not show any anomalies.

Source: Instituto Geofísico-Escuela Politécnica Nacional (IG)

Weekly Reports - Index


2018: October


10 October-16 October 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

IG reported that, after an earthquake swarm consisting of 62 volcano-tectonic events during 2-3 October, seismicity at Cuicocha returned to background levels on 4 October. Carbon dioxide levels were normal, and deformation data did not show any anomalies.

Source: Instituto Geofísico-Escuela Politécnica Nacional (IG)


3 October-9 October 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

IG reported an increase in seismic activity at Cuicocha during 2-3 October, characterized by a total of 60 volcano-tectonic events recorded at the time of the report posting. The largest of these events, a M 2.5 at 1058 on 2 October, was reportedly slightly felt by a resident of Quiroga.

Source: Instituto Geofísico-Escuela Politécnica Nacional (IG)


The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Cuicocha.

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Eruptive History

There is data available for 4 Holocene eruptive periods.

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0650 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
0950 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
1150 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
2550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
Deformation History

There is no Deformation History data available for Cuicocha.

Emission History

There is no Emissions History data available for Cuicocha.

Photo Gallery

An explosive eruption about 2900 years ago produced widespread tephra and pyroclastic surges. Subsequently a group of four dacitic lava domes was constructed within Cuicocha caldera. This marks the latest known activity from the caldera. The eastern two domes are seen here from the SE rim of the caldera. The lava domes form two forested islands in the center of the 3-km-wide caldera.

Photo by Tom Pierson, 1992 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
Sharp-peaked Cotacachi stratovolcano rises above the caldera lake of Cuicocha volcano. The northern caldera wall truncates the flank of the heavily eroded Cotacachi. The caldera was formed during powerful explosive eruptions about 3100 years ago that produced 4.8 cu km of pumice-rich pyroclastic flows and airfall tephra that blanket the surrounding countryside.

Photo by Tom Pierson, 1992 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
Scenic lake-filled Cuicocha caldera is located at the southern foot of the sharp-peaked Pleistocene Cotacachi stratovolcano. The caldera was created about 3100 years ago and contains a cluster of intra-caldera dacitic lava domes that form two islands in the large lake. A pre-caldera Cuicocha lava dome is situated on the east side of the lake (right). Pyroclastic-flow deposits cover wide areas around the volcano. The northern caldera rim truncates the heavily eroded slopes of Cotocachi volcano.

Photo by Minard Hall, 1985 (Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Quito).
See title for photo information.
The scenic lake-filled Cuicocha caldera is located at the southern foot of the sharp-peaked Pleistocene Cotacachi stratovolcano (top center) about 100 km north of Quito. Farmer's fields encroach on the rim of the 3-km-wide caldera, which was created during a major explosive eruption about 3100 years ago. Dacitic lava domes form two forested islands in the caldera lake. Pyroclastic-flow deposits from the caldera-forming eruptions cover wide areas in now populated areas below the low-rimmed caldera.

Photo by Patricio Ramon, 2003 (Instituto Geofisca, Escuela Politecnica Nacional).
See title for photo information.
GVP Map Holdings

The maps shown below have been scanned from the GVP map archives and include the volcano on this page. Clicking on the small images will load the full 300 dpi map. Very small-scale maps (such as world maps) are not included. The maps database originated over 30 years ago, but was only recently updated and connected to our main database. We welcome users to tell us if they see incorrect information or other problems with the maps; please use the Contact GVP link at the bottom of the page to send us email.

Title: Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Venezuela
Publisher: DMA Aerospace Center
Country: S America
Year: 1981
Series: ONC
Map Type: Navigation
Scale: 1:1,000,000
Map of Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Venezuela
Smithsonian Sample Collections Database

There are no samples for Cuicocha in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites